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for respondents. Hayahaya was selected because their ngoma appears to borrow heavily from muziki wa dansi , Taarab, and the dance cultures of Kenya. The inclusion of their data sheds light on the role of creative energy in the emergence of cross cultural dances. Collecting data with Hayahaya, I

In: Utafiti
The volume Environmental Change and African Societies contributes to current debates on global climate change from the perspectives of the social sciences and the humanities. It charts past and present environmental change in different African settings and also discusses policies and scenarios for the future. The first section, “Ideas”, enquires into local perceptions of the environment, followed by contributions on historical cases of environmental change and state regulation. The section “Present” addresses decision-making and agenda-setting processes related to current representations and/or predicted effects of climate change. The section “Prospects” is concerned with contemporary African megatrends. The authors move across different scales of investigation, from locally-grounded ethnographic analyses to discussions on continental trends and international policy.
Contributors are: Daniel Callo-Concha, Joy Clancy, Manfred Denich, Sara de Wit, Ton Dietz, Irit Eguavoen, Ben Fanstone, Ingo Haltermann, Laura Jeffrey, Emmanuel Kreike, Vimbai Kwashirai, James C. McCann, Bertrand F. Nero, Jonas Ø. Nielsen, Erick G. Tambo, Julia Tischler.

differently. Environmental benefits and burdens are often distributed in ways that seem unjust especially with respect to different states in Africa. 2 While it is incontrovertible that African land is vast and rich in mineral, biological, physical, and energy resources, the dimensions of the global

In: Matatu

(as in “Omiyale,” 17, a powerful description of the destructive energy of the flooding caused by Katrina that alludes to the disastrous flash floods in Ibadan in 1980, popularly nicknamed ‘Omiyale’), appear without tonal marks and diacritics where they would normally be idiomatically appropriate. The

In: Matatu

to stand up for themselves against rulers who depend on brutal force and intimidation as an art of governance, a view shared by Emmanuel Ngara, who observes that the poet in Village Voices “devotes his poetic energies to the service of the exploited African peasantry.” 8 Aderemi Bamikunle

In: Matatu

Military Police) ‘sexploit’ women who have been made vulnerable by war. These highly placed Biafran officers fail to focus on the sensitive demands of their positions. They waste time and energy on the cravings of their libido, going to any lengths to get women into bed. A certain Rivers man is framed and

In: Matatu

forced to move to the cities in search of jobs, leaving women to work alone, and harder, to cater for the needs of the family. 12 Ynestra King posits: For most of the women of the world, interest in the preservation of the land, water, air, and energy is no abstraction but a clear part of the

In: Matatu

contested elections.” Besides, “Ghanaians, have chosen Constitutional rule over autocracy, and shown a democratic spirit that allows the energy of the people to break through”; Ghana has cast up “leaders who accept defeat graciously, and victors who resist calls to wield power against the opposition

In: Matatu

language issue more seriously than it ever did in the past. The reason why language problems in institutions of learning have been tackled with less energy than other war-related issues such as widowhood and orphanhood may be the fact that learners are in ostensibly well-organized and

In: Matatu

away from the reality of life’s intimidating complexity.” 31 This is because the writer who “chooses to turn away soon runs out of energy,” 32 and when literature is scrutinized, only writers who align themselves with their society in its struggle to overcome the vicissitudes of life will be

In: Matatu