The Enlightened Eye

Goethe and Visual Culture

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Edited by Evelyn K. Moore and Patricia Anne Simpson

Poets, painters, philosophers, and scientists alike debated new ways of thinking about visual culture in the “long eighteenth century”. The essays in The Enlightened Eye: Goethe and Visual Culture demonstrate the extent to which Goethe advanced this discourse in virtually all disciplines. The concept of visuality becomes a constitutive moment in a productive relationship between the verbal and visual arts with far-reaching implications for the formation of bourgeois identity, pedagogy, and culture. From a variety of theoretical perspectives, the contributors to this volume examine the interconnections between aesthetic and scientific fields of inquiry involved in Goethe’s visual identity. By locating Goethe’s position in the examination of visual culture, both established and emerging scholars analyze the degree to which visual aesthetics determined the cultural production of both the German-speaking world and the broader European context. The contributions analyze the production, presentation, and consumption of visual culture defined broadly as painting, sculpture, theater, and scientific practice. The Enlightened Eye promises to invest new energy and insight into the discussion among literary scholars, art historians, and cultural theorists about many aspects of visual culture in the Age of Goethe.

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Edited by Rolf H. Bremmer Jr.

Of the many fine scholars who made and have maintained the high reputation of the Dutch Republic in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, Franciscus Junius the Younger (1591-1677) is one who has not yet been given the attention he deserves. Born and brought up among the élite Calvinist scholars of Leiden University, he began his career as a theologian. As a consequence of the religious quarrels between the Arminians and Gomarists, he resigned from his office, and went to England where in 1620 he was attached as a tutor and librarian to the household of the Earl of Arundel, an assiduous art-collector. His work as Arundel's librarian resulted in the publication in 1637 of De pictura veterum, a penetrating analysis of the Classical arts. This book laid the foundation of modern art-history. Later in his life Junius devoted most of his time and energy to the study of the Old Germanic languages, culminating in 1665 in the publication of the first edition of the Gothic Bible, together with a Gothic dictionary.
The present volume contains contributions on many aspects of Junius's life, his work as an art-historian, as a Neo-Latin author, his studies of Philip Sydney and Edmund Spencer, and of his Germanic philology. A check-list of his correspondence completes the volume. Contributors include C.S.M. Rademaker, Philipp Fehl, Colette Nativel, Judith Dundas, Chris H. Heesakkers, Ph.H. Breuker, Peter J. Lucas, E.G. Stanley and Rolf H. Bremmer Jr., and Sophie van Romburgh.

Germany and Eastern Europe

Cultural Identities and Cultural Differences

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Edited by Keith Bullivant, Geoffrey Giles and Walter Pape

The opening up, and subsequent tearing down, of the Berlin Wall in 1989 effectively ended a historically unique period for Europe that had drastically changed its face over a period of fifty years and redefined, in all sorts of ways, what was meant by East and West. For Germany in particular this radical change meant much more than unification of the divided country, although initially this process seemed to consume all of the country's energies and emotions. While the period of the Cold War saw the emergence of a Federal Republic distinctly Western in orientation, the coming down of the Iron Curtain meant that Germany's relationship with its traditional neighbours to the East and the South-East, which had been essentially frozen or redefined in different ways for the two German states by the Cold War, had to be rediscovered. This volume, which brings together scholars in German Studies from the United States, Germany and other European countries, examines the history of the relationship between Germany and Eastern Europe and the opportunities presented by the changes of the 1990's, drawing particular attention to the interaction between the willingness of German and its Eastern neighbours to work for political and economic inte-gration, on the one hand, and the cultural and social problems that stem from old prejudices and unresolved disputes left over from the Second World War, on the other.

Angelika Kemper

can say, perhaps, that an individual play mediates between the mode of the theater […] and elements of the society out of which that theater has been differentiated. Through its representational means, each play carries charges of social energy onto the stage; the stage in its turn revises that energy

From the Harz Mountains to the Atlantic and Back Again

Or: Johann Gottfried Schnabel’s Journalistic Efforts and his Wunderliche Fata einiger Seefahrer (Insel Felsenburg)

Matthias Meyer

Stanislaus, the contender for the Polish crown, taking the role of a minor villain in the background). Here Schnabel invests a lot of his narrative energy. His problem is that of every writer/editor who wants to present events while they are unfolding (the same problem can already be found in medieval