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“you are never too young or too old to start a new life.” 66 She is a woman of profound wisdom, survival experience, abundant compassion, and enormous energy, but she is just one woman and there are at least 16,000 prostitutes in the Chicagoland area. While there are certainly more non-profits and

In: Selling Sex in the City: A Global History of Prostitution, 1600s-2000s
In: Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected
Origins and Futures: Time Inflected and Reflected provokes an interdisciplinary dialogue about culture, politics, and science’s strategies to divert the relentless trajectory of time. Literature, socio-political policy, physics, among other subjects, demonstrate the human refusal to enlist in temporal determinism. Articles ranging from how detective fiction and international terrorism manipulate the narration of events, to the unlocking of political trauma through forgiveness, to the genetic archaeology of the Human Genome project and the lacunar amnesia of nuclear energy corporations, all argue that wherever human minds meet they wrestle to undo the irrevocable, the irreversible, the fixed. Although such efforts look to the future, they rarely look straight ahead. Whatever their enterprise, writers, philosophers, and scientists believe that origins are alacritous keys to future hopes and aspirations.

Contributors include: Marcus Bullock, Michael Crawford, Patricia Engle, Carol Fischer, J. T. Fraser, Sabine Gross, Paul Harris, Rosemary Huisman, Karmen MacKendrick, Steven Ostovich, Walter Schweidler, Friedel Weinert, and Masae Yuasa.
This 10th thematic issue of International Development Policy presents a collection of articles exploring some of the complex development challenges associated with Africa’s recent but extremely rapid pace of urbanisation that challenges still predominant but misleading images of Africa as a rural continent. Analysing urban settings through the diverse experiences and perspectives of inhabitants and stakeholders in cities across the continent, the authors consider the evolution of international development policy responses amidst the unique historical, social, economic and political contexts of Africa’s urban development.
This issue of International Development Policy looks at recent paradigmatic innovations and related development trajectories in Latin America, with a particular focus on the Andean region. It examines the diverse development narratives and experiences in countries such as Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru during a period of high commodity prices associated with robust growth, poverty alleviation and inequality reduction. Highlighting propositions such as buen vivir, this thematic issue questions whether competing ideologies and discourses have translated into different outcomes, be it with regard to environmental sustainability, social progress, primary commodity dependence, or the rights of indigenous peoples. This collection of articles aims to enrich our understanding of recent development debates and processes in Latin America, and what the rest of the world can learn from them.

this situation’, Plácido continued, because during that period we also had to compete with foreign interests that had recently entered the printing and publishing market. Because of all of this, the workers here started demanding more compensation. We had put all of our efforts and energy into this

In: Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina

for physical resistance … It is also necessary [for ERT  s] to find a legal framework that can permit them to function not only within a position of moral legitimacy, but also from one of legal legitimacy that can allow workers to throw their energies [, especially in the vital first months of

In: Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina

and its policies both drew energy from traditional Peronist sentiments while modernising them to address the new political economic and social realities of post-convertability Argentina. A posture of social containment – articulated via new social programmes and subsidies to the poor (for instance

In: Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina

producing new, technologically sophisticated products in collaboration with the communities (rather than markets) that would benefit most from such technologies. Through worker innovation and community collaboration, Lucas went from producing jet turbines to co-inventing and producing energy-saving domestic

In: Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina

national economy and its ensuing crisis bore witness to a new ‘energy … [of] conviction, and … egalitarian social recomposition’ emerging from the urban barrios and industrialised towns of the country. 6 By the early years of the 2000s, much cross-pollination was taking place between these grass roots

In: Workers’ Self-Management in Argentina