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Author: Amadeo Bordiga
Editor: Pietro Basso

1 Report to the Fourth Congress of the C.I. (1922) 1 Chair: The congress is now in session. I give the floor to Comrade Bordiga for the report on Fascism. Bordiga (Italy): Dear comrades, I regret that unusual circumstances affecting communication

In: The Science and Passion of Communism
Selected Writings of Amadeo Bordiga (1912–1965)
Author: Amadeo Bordiga
Editor: Pietro Basso
Translator: Giacomo Donis
The Science and Passion of Communism presents the battles of the brilliant Italian communist Amadeo Bordiga in the revolutionary cycle of the post-WWI period, through his writings against reformism and war, for Soviet power and internationalism, and then against fascism, on one side, Stalinism and the degeneration of the International, on the other.

Equally important was his sharp critique of triumphant U.S. capitalism in the post-WWII period, and his original re-presentation of Marxist critique of political economy, which includes the capital-nature and capital-species relationships, and the programme of social transformations for the revolution to come.

Without any form of canonization, we can say that Bordiga’s huge workshop is a veritable goldmine, and anyone who decides to enter it will not be disappointed. He will guide you through a series of instructive, energizing and often highly topical excursions into the near and distant past, into the present that he largely foresaw, and into the future that he sketched with devouring passion.
Volume Editor: Holger Weiss
This book provides an analysis of the articulation and organisation of radical international solidarity by organisations that were either connected to or had been established by the Communist International (Comintern), such as the International Red Aid, the International Workers’ Relief, the League Against Imperialism, the International of Seamen and Harbour Workers and the International Trade Union Committee of Negro Workers. The guiding light of these organisations was a radical interpretation of international solidarity, usually in combination with concepts and visions of gender, race and class as well as anti-capitalism, anti-imperialism, anti-colonialism and anti-fascism. All of these new transnational networks form a controversial part of the contemporary history of international organisations. Like the Comintern these international organisations had an ambigious character that does not fit nicely into the traditional typologies of international organisations as they were neither international governmental organisations nor international non-governmental organisations. They constituted a radical continuation of the pre-First World War Left and exemplified an attempt to implement the ideas and movements of a new type of radical international solidarity not only in Europe, but on a global scale.

Contributors are: Gleb J. Albert, Bernhard H. Bayerlein, Kasper Braskén, Fredrik Petersson, Holger Weiss.

based on charisma (e.g., Fascism, Populism, Messianic political movements …). Thirdly, rational-legal domination, ascendancy (Plato’s philosopher-king, benevolent populism …). Many Marxist scholars have reverberated Weber’s views if not directly used his schemes. Before the thirteenth century CE and

In: Asian Review of World Histories
Author: David Kertzer

Eisner, a well-respected American journalist, offers an account for a broader public. It tells a dramatic story. The aging Pius XI, increasingly viewing Nazism and Fascism as the greatest enemies Western civilization faced, and especially upset by the racism and anti-Semitism they were propounding

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Jonathan Wright

-Reformation, a specialized monograph on the life and times of Maximilian Hell, and reviews of books that tackle subjects as diverse as the Roman Inquisition, missionaries in various parts of the Americas, and the Catholic church’s encounter with Fascism. This reflects the topical and chronological range to which

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

her previous publications. Through its comprehensive analysis of church-state relations during the fascist years, Ceci’s book is on par with works by the likes of John Pollard, who through his The Vatican and Italian Fascism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985), or, more recently The

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

“Jewish Jesuit” and the leftist subversive, the Jesuit does contemporary service in comparisons with Islamist extremism. In Norway, a similar phenomenon conflates Catholicism with both fascism and communism. The confessional nationalism of the state church cemented into law a paragraph entailing the death

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

(131). Pius xi poses a conundrum for Misner because of his ambivalent response to the rise of Italian Fascism. Mussolini did not consolidate Fascist power in Italy until 1926, but Pius xi responded almost immediately to his appointment as prime minister in October 1922 with stern demands that all

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Amadeo Bordiga
Editor: Pietro Basso

CPI and the Struggle against Fascism The Partito Comunista d’Italia ( CPI ), the Italian section of the Communist International, was born on 21 January 1921 in Livorno, through a split from the PSI . The tempestuous postwar situation in Italy and internationally had long put a severe strain

In: The Science and Passion of Communism