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 Baʿal Shem (Hebr.; “Master of the Name”) was credited with miraculous and healing powers. In Hasidism, the mystic movement that emerged in Eastern Europe in the late-18th century, the religious leader, the tsaddik (righteous), took on the functions of a Baʿal Shem.

intellect intellectually cognizing an intellectually cognized object. Avicenna uses the same expression, e.g., at Metaphysics of the Healing , ed. and trans. Michael Marmura (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2005), 285, line 6. Avicenna’s description of God there is quite similar to Maimonides

In: Studies in the Formation of Medieval Hebrew Philosophical Terminology

anthropological and sociological approaches to explore the phenomenon of shamanism. By combining cross-cultural evidence with firsthand interviews from two modern healers (shamans?), I will demonstrate how social scientific tools can provide striking insights about the significance of children in 1 Kgs 17

In: Children and Methods

narrative’s position within Mark’s Gospel and how it develops the themes and motifs of the Gospel. One of the main themes of the Gospel, the in-breaking of the reign of God, is manifest in all of the healings, exorcisms, and miracles which take place throughout the Gospel. 33 Mark 7:24–30 includes the

In: Children and Methods
In many near eastern traditions, including Christianity, Judaism and Islam, demons have appeared as a cause of illness from ancient times until at least the early modern period. This volume explores the relationship between demons, illness and treatment comparatively. Its twenty chapters range from Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt to early modern Europe, and include studies of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They discuss the relationship between ‘demonic’ illnesses and wider ideas about illness, medicine, magic, and the supernatural. A further theme of the volume is the value of treating a wide variety of periods and places, using a comparative approach, and this is highlighted particularly in the volume’s Introduction and Afterword. The chapters originated in an international conference held in 2013.

"Ultimately, Demons and Illness admirably performs the important task of reminding modern scholars of premodern health of the integral role played by these complex and shifting entities in the lives of people across the globe and through the centuries." - Rachel Podd, Fordham University, in: Social History of Medicine 32.3 (2019)

relatively straight-forward affair, other remnants such as healing rituals or the use of certain remedies proved much more difficult to censure because they responded to local need and because it was not altogether clear how heretic they truly were. It is even possible that, on many such instances, identity

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

.e. Bardaiṣan) had examined him (i.e. Shemashgram) and seen that he was faring well, he asked us … We are thus told that a group of believers went “to visit” Shemashgram. The verb used here is from the root S -ʿ- R (‮ܣܥܪ‬‎), which is often used in the sense of “to care for, look after, heal.” The

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

Paracelsus or his followers, the Paracelsists, such as Oswaldus Crollius (c. 1560–1608), proved efficacious in healing some diseases. As the century progressed, the boundaries between the rival schools gradually began to disappear. This development was marked by a book by the eclecticist Daniel Sennert (1572

In: Intellectual History of the Islamicate World

.” 24 Restoration stories involving Jesus’ healings and exorcisms signal the dawning of this reign. 25 For example, the restoration of a possessed man in the Capernaum synagogue provides the first such instance (Mark 1:21–28), but as Mary Ann Tolbert’s work has shown, the account of Jesus’ parable of

In: Children and Methods

. Solevåg invites us to look for children who have fallen through the cracks, those children who do not adhere to the clear-cut categories recognized by society. The disabled Syrophoenician child is one such child. As discussed by Betsworth, this child is often identified as passive, receiving healing

In: Children and Methods