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Peter Rogers

Drawing upon Flaubert’s fictional works, travel writings, correspondence, and notes on his reading of the Bible and interest in iconography, Rogers traces the presence of a liturgical drama, a mystery play, in a text known as iconic of the realist novel. Showing how Flaubert’s use of religious tales, topoi, and imagery extends beyond his retelling of saints’ lives in the Tentation de Saint Antoine and the Trois contes, this study elucidates the biblical and devotional subcurrent in the story of Emma Bovary. Biblical episodes, religious emblems, and discussions of Catholic dogma link the adulterous heroine to the Virgin Mary, who emerges in the course of this subtle reading as the other heroine of the scandalous story.
The 19th-century impulse to censor is embodied within the novel by two characters representing the secular and religious poles. The free-thinking pharmacist Homais and the parish priest concur only on the dangers of reading the Bible. When the novel itself was brought to trial for attacking religion, Flaubert’s prosecutor and defense lawyer overlooked this condemnation of scripture. This study invites readers to pay close attention to the religious texts and traditions discussed and restaged in Madame Bovary to gain a new awareness of the narrow bond between theatre and religion in Flaubert’s provinces.

Where Never Before

Beckett’s Poetics of Elsewhere: La poétique de l’ailleurs

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Edited by Sjef Houppermans, Angela Moorjani, Danièle de Ruyter-Tognotti, Matthijs Engelberts and Dirk Van Hulle

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Edited by Claire Davison-Pégon and Gerri Kimber

Katherine Mansfield’s French Lives explores how both the literary, cultural, editorial and biographical influence of French arts and philosophy, and life as an émigré in France shaped Mansfield’s evolution as a key modernist writer, while setting her within the geographies and cultural dynamics of Anglo-French modernism.

Mansfield’s many stays in France were decisive in intellectual, personal and psychological terms: discovering ‘Murry’s Paris’ and the Left Bank; escaping to the War Zone to join Francis Carco; living as a civilian in wartime during the bombardments of Paris; travelling and finding lodgings as a single woman in war-ravaged towns; the experience of bereavement and debilitating ill-health abroad; and the joys and pitfalls for an outsider of a foreign land and idiom.

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Edited by David Evans and Kate Griffiths

From Sade at one end of the nineteenth century to Freud at the other, via many French novelists and poets, pleasure and pain become ever more closely entwined. Whereas the inseparability of these themes has hitherto been studied from isolated perspectives, such as psychoanalysis, sadism and sado-masochism, melancholy, or post-structuralist textual jouissance, the originality of this collaborative volume lies in its exploration of how pleasure and pain function across a broader range of contexts. The essays collected here demonstrate how the complex relationship between pleasure and pain plays a vital role in structuring nineteenth-century thinking in prose fiction (Balzac, Flaubert, Musset, Maupassant, Zola), verse and the memoir as well as socio-cultural studies, medical discourses, aesthetic theory and the visual arts. Featuring an international selection of contributors representing the full range of approaches to scholarship in nineteenth-century French studies – historical, literary, cultural, art historical, philosophical, and sociopolitical – the volume attests to the vitality, coherence and interdisciplinarity of nineteenth-century French studies and will be of interest to a wide cross-section of scholars and students of French literature, society and culture.

Perspectives on the ‘Other America’

Comparative Approaches to Caribbean and Latin American Culture

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Edited by Michael Niblett and Kerstin Oloff

Uniting critical writing on novels, poetry, painting, and ritual, this volume takes a regional approach to the cultures of the Caribbean Basin. Ranging across the linguistic spectrum of the area, it examines cultural production from the Anglophone, Francophone, and Hispanophone islands, Suriname and the Guyanas, and ‘Latin’ and Central America. The interdisciplinary nature of the collection and the challenge it poses to the balkanization of the region within academic discourse will make it of especial interest to students and scholars of the Caribbean. Inspired by the category of the ‘Other America’ as developed by Édouard Glissant, the book offers a series of original and stimulating engagements with topics that include nationalism, migration and exile, landscape and the environment, gender and sexuality, and Postcolonial Studies and ‘world literature’. In addition to contributions by leading scholars such as Peter Hulme, Theo D’haen, and Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert, it contains interviews with two renowned novelists from the region, Lawrence Scott and Mayra Santos-Febres. Underpinning the collection is an interrogation of received ideas of the nation-state and a suggestion that regionalism might provide a better optic through which to view the circum-Caribbean – that national consciousness, in other words, must always also be a regional consciousness.