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Paradise City

The Representation of an Urban Heaven in the Art of John Martin

Chris Coltrin

depicted an immense colonnade-lined stadium holding thousands of angelic spectators. Beyond the stadium lies a massive city, hovering above the stadium and composed of vast horizontally oriented structures interspersed with occasional vertical towers. The basic composition is essentially classical in its

John Renard

shapes can acquire symbolic meaning, and claiming, on the basis of Jungian archetypal theory (for example), that certain shapes are always and everywhere univocally symbolic. These shapes are seldom invested with symbolic value, if at all, in isolation from their horizontal counterparts- in other words

John Renard

shapes can acquire symbolic meaning, and claiming, on the basis of Jungian archetypal theory (for example), that certain shapes are always and everywhere univocally symbolic. These shapes are seldom invested with symbolic value, if at all, in isolation from their horizontal counterparts- in other words

Jane Daggett Dillenberger

two moods and differing insights into the person portrayed. But in the pink Last Supper the black images are identical and the background a uniformly glowing pink. The two scenes of the Last Supper are anchored by the long horizontal of the table coverings which fall along the edge of the table. Since

Jane Daggett Dillenberger

the pink Last Supper the black images are identical and the background a uniformly glowing pink. The two scenes of the Last Supper are anchored by the long horizontal of the table coverings which fall along the edge of the table. Since these appear to be in our space (on our side of the picture plane

Jonathan Koestlé-Cate

order to eschew any possible figuration or pattern. In fact, the results are not entirely haphazard, with elements doubled and whole sections repeated in reverse, and certain colored squares deliberately altered to avoid any misconstrual of image. But the overall effect is of random configurations of

Adam Hardy

superstructure above. Movement is in relation to the vertical axis running from the center of the sanctum to the tip of the finial, and the horizontal axes running towards the four cardinal points. Emergence and expansion are conceived as progressing downwards from the summit, and outwards in all directions, but

John Renard

succession of small circular domes rather than with horizontal beamed roofing. At the Sulaymaniye, the main entry facade of the courtyard is on axis with that of the prayer hall (fig. 2). The typical later Ottoman plan clearly shows, therefore, two large spaces, one covered and one uncovered, the latter with

John Renard

succession of small circular domes rather than with horizontal beamed roofing. At the Sulaymaniye, the main entry facade of the courtyard is on axis with that of the prayer hall (fig. 2). The typical later Ottoman plan clearly shows, therefore, two large spaces, one covered and one uncovered, the latter with

Emily Turner

his own critical commentary; Scott does not elaborate on Feild’s description but simply reprints it for full effect (20–22). It is clear from the Bishop’s letter that these churches are basic clapboard or weatherboard buildings in a style that is above all else practical, easy to build, suited to