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, which mark him as an Ammonian form. His name is destroyed except for ḥr , Horus, but his epithet tpj n ỉmn , ‘first of Amun’, survives. Three goddesses are seated behind the child-god. The first two—the Great Goddess (Isis) and Mut—are quite damaged, with only some outlines of the lower bodies and

In: Hieratic, Demotic and Greek Studies and Text Editions

‘Isis-Nephersês’ is attested in one demotic papyrus from the temple and ‘Isis the goddess [mother], Harsiesis the great god, and … the great god and the gods and goddesses united to her’ in another, both based on translations provided by Spiegelberg. The latter is almost certainly the self

In: Hieratic, Demotic and Greek Studies and Text Editions

within royal families and amongst the Libyan high society. 26 However that may be, Osorkon emphasized the maternal line of his descent, even after having become king as Osorkon III, as appears from NLR 5 (?), 6 and 7, in which his mother the king’s great wife Ka(ro)mama Merimut is mentioned. This seems

In: Journal of Egyptian History

the state theology, as with the small scaraboid plaque with its solar symbolism from a burial at Tombos (noted above). The more modest but nonetheless significant votive offerings 42 Romer, Ancient lives , 61–93. 43 Wilkinson, The Complete Gods and Goddesses , 133–35, 230; Andrews, Amulets of Ancient

In: Journal of Egyptian History

’s wig. In its present condition, five columns of text above and behind the prince’s figure contain a hymn of adoration to Mut, invoking her by several epithets and by the names of goddesses linked to her such as Weret-Hekau. 8 This inscription concludes abruptly with the phrase [. . .] ḥm.f n

In: Journal of Egyptian History

mother. 50 He follows Posener’s argument that Neferti’s reference to the prophesied savior Ameni as a “child of a woman of tꜢ-sty ” indicates that she was from the first Upper Egyptian nome rather than Lower Nubia. For all the elegance of Posener’s literary argument, the use of the “foreign land

In: Journal of Egyptian History

protective goddesses from the tomb of Senebkay resemble in style those depicted on the foot end of some Second Intermediate Period Theban rishi coffins, 11 so they may probably be attributed to the same artistic tradition. Thus, the reality of an independent Abydos Dynasty remains not convincingly

In: Journal of Egyptian History

. die Bezeichnung auf seinem Plan V, 10. 88 Petrie, Athribis , 22, übersetzt hier „beloved of gods and goddesses, of the Eye of Horus (Sochmet) in the West and of Harpokrates“ (östliche Seite, nördliche Hälfte des Tores) bzw. „beloved of gods and goddesses, and of Min, lord of Apu“ (östliche Seite

In: Journal of Egyptian History