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Kumāratantra of Rāvaṇa explored by Filliozat name twelve mātṛkās (mothers) 13 that “seize” the young child ( bāla ), the “Chapter on Pediatrics” (Kaumārabhritya tantra) in the Final Section (Uttara-tantra) of the Compendium of Suśruta lists the effects of the harmful influence of nine grahas

In: Asian Medicine

to the Jowo, thus causing a shower of barley from the sky. 20 I have seen few biographies more dominated by food than that of Tangtong Gyelpo. His mother when pregnant dreamt of food, once feeding the hungry and partaking of a great feast atop a faraway ruby mountain. 21 When Tangtong was less than

In: Asian Medicine

, without any doubt, only by authorization of her husband (U.16828, UET V 34); also the widows with whom written agreements were made concerning their 226 alimentation by their sons, certainly could not enter into official or business relations with third persons (thus Aliabi, mother of WaradNannal), U

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

husband of many women His 'wives' were originally local mother-goddesses, each in her own right. The 'husband' eased the transition from mother-right to patriar- chal life, and allowed the original cults to be practised on a subordinate level. This is even better seen in the marriage of Siva and Parvati

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

, mothers viewed the development and happiness of infants younger than two with indifference.” 13 Shorter also goes further, inverting the standard presentation of the parental indifference hypothesis by arguing that disinterest in infants is not a product of high infant mortality rates, but rather their

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

dans la sociŽ tŽ indig ne. Keywords : Ramnad, VOC, Dutch, South India, perceptions Because the mother of the Theuver [Tevar, i.e. Setupati] has said to the Nataars that whatever they would steal and loot, would be their booty, they have taken this, and stand surety for the success. 1 * Lennart Bes

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

contemporary of Esarhaddon and Ashur- 293 banipal. The barely intelligible source reports the capture of men who murdered their master, a merchant from Carchemish. Their arrest is accomplished thanks to the kidinnu of the goddesses Ninlil and Sarrat-Kidmuri, "the mothers who love the king"48). The kidinnu

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

two axes, one with reference to Buddhism, often suggesting its close links with trading groups and the second indicating that a number of autonomous and fragmented traditions existed, which centred on the worship of local goddesses. A sem- blance of homogeneity and transformation to a distinctive

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient

lords to die early. How do we know that it is so? For a wife, she does not have the bond of bone and flesh (blood relationship) [with her husband]. When her husband loves her, he draws himself close to her; when he no longer loves her, he keeps himself away from her. A saying goes, ‘if a mother is

In: Asian Medicine

indicator of a Phoenician presence are the numerous memories of cult centers of the Phoenician Astarte, the protectress of sea-farers. She was either implanted by Phoenician mariners or local goddesses were identified with her. In many cases, the Greeks later adopted this Astarte and called her Aphrodite

In: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient