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father and mother’ (Orgyen Jikmé Chökyi Wangpo: 117). Nevertheless, Buddhism strictly forbids women to visit certain temples; it also maintains that the potential for women to achieve enlightenment is low, and states that women have to aspire to be reborn as a male before achieving enlightenment

In: Inner Asia

Tibet: Then, at the time the Princess Wencheng went to Tibet, she said this to her father the king, ‘O Father King, listen with your ear and grant me the words of my dear Father! Grant me the words of my dear Mother! Dear brother and Sister, have you lost the ability to speak?!? Alas, i cannot believe

In: Inner Asia

, that Wu Zhao made careful and calculated strategic use of over the course of her nearly fifty-year career: goddesses of antiquity, dynastic and exemplary mothers, female Daoist divinities, and Buddhist devis and goddesses. Using an extensive and varied range of historical and literary sources

In: NAN NÜ

Eight Trigrams Uprising of 1813 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1976), 9-18; Daniel L. Overmeyer, Folk Buddhist Religion: Dissenting Sects in Late Traditional China (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1976), 73-108, 135-45; on the worship of mother goddesses, see also Marjorie

In: NAN NÜ

’ang Dynasty (618-907),” in Arvind Sharma, ed., Women in World Religions (Albany: State University of New York Press, 2000), pp. 205-20. ———. “e Goddess, the Emperor, and the Adept: e Queen Mother of the West as Bestower of Legitimacy and Immortality,” in Elisabeth Benard and Beverly Moon, eds., Goddesses

In: NAN NÜ

divine origins suggested by her mother’s dream before her birth. It also constitutes a metaphor for death when it “intends to follow the Queen Mother of the West,” thus eluding the traps set by men. 21 The two goddesses of the Xiao and Xiang also point to suicide, as these two wives of the legendary sage

In: NAN NÜ

Mother of the West’s meeting with King Mu 䧮 of the Zhou ␐ (r. 1001-946 BC) and other emperors, the Divine Woman at Wu ⶓ Mountain’s meeting with the emperor of Chu 㤂 (third century BC), and Lady Youying’s ⎛劙 meeting with the literatus Xu Mi 姙媸 (303-73). 18  e men deemed qualifi ed to meet female

In: NAN NÜ

accommodation, negotiation, and mutual influence are also highlighted by Ping Yao in her essay in this issue that picks up on earlier work on this topic. For example, Josephine Chiu-Duke has persuasively shown that during the Tang dynasty mothers appear to have exerted a particularly high degree of influence

In: NAN NÜ

adopted at the beginning of this article. The first fourteen scenes present a portrayal of the “life” of Maiden Cao, starting with the extraordinary conception of Maiden Cao with divine assistance, and continuing with Maiden Cao’s miraculous healing of her mother, and culminating in her heroic death. The

In: NAN NÜ

. 54 
 Fortunately, the explanation appears in Dali gudai wenhuashi , where Xu gives an etymology of Baijie’s name:
 Among the goddesses is the Holy Consort Cypress Chastity [Baijie Shengfei 柏節聖妃], namely Holy Consort White Sister [Baijie Shengfei 白姐聖妃]. [White Sister] Baijie was the founding mother

In: NAN NÜ