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interviewed asserted that even though they worshipped various goddesses called amman (Mother), these were only manifestations of one Supreme Being. 79 Therefore, in the midst of all the ambiguity of the manifestations of the Dalit goddesses, I believe we can say that there is a deeper and broader and

In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation

In the previous chapter, I noted that interpreting Paraiyar religious traditions as liberative, while certainly possible, has its difficulties. As pointed out in the last section, iconic representations of the goddesses which signify the protection of the vulnerable Dalits and myths that portray

In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation

traditional religion of the Dalits is ambiguous in character, there are positive aspects to it such as its community-orientation and people-centeredness. … Though the traditional world-view of the Dalits is beset with beliefs about magic, spirits, gods and goddesses causing evil, appeasement of ancestral

In: Untouchable Bodies, Resistance, and Liberation
From Margaret Atwood to Jenny Diski
How are well-known female characters from the Bible represented in late 20th-century novels? In Biblical Women in Contemporary Novels in English, Ingrid Bertrand presents a detailed analysis of biblical rewritings by Roberts, Atwood, Tennant, Diamant and Diski focusing on six different women (Eve, Noah’s wife, Sarah, Bilhah, Dinah and Mary Magdalene). She shows how these heroines give themselves a voice that rests not only on words but also on silences. Exploring the many forms that silence can take, she presents an innovative typology that sheds new light on this profoundly meaningful phenomenon.

the coffin. She is found painted on the inside of coffin lids in the Middle Kingdom (Figure 3), where her protective body covers the deceased. Mortuary Goddesses of Ancient Egypt Nut As the mother of the gods in their celestial forms, Nut gives birth each morning to the sun-god and

In: Journal of Religion in Africa

Arts 12 (2008) 230–243 243 Brown, W. Norman, trans. Th e Saundarya Lahari or Flood of Beauty . Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 1958. Clooney, Francis X., S.J. Divine Mother, Blessed Mother: Hindu Goddesses and the Virgin Mary . New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. ———. Hindu God, Christian

In: Religion and the Arts

towards the end of his life but his heart was heavy even in that paradise on earth. Large-hearted though he was, he felt tormented by the fact that successive invaders had des- ecrated and destroyed countless sacred images of Hinduism’s Gods and Goddesses and pulled down Hindu temples and built mosques

In: Religion and the Arts

transformation of Baijie over a millennium, starting in the Nanzhao kingdom (752–902), continuing through the Dali kingdom (938–1254), and ending in the present. It proposes the existence of three forms of Baijie—goddess/deity, mother, and widow—rather than only the last one, which is more familiar. The five

In: Religion and the Arts

, regenera- tive female energies and procreative potential. In the discourse developed by devotees that Z-Helene Christopher explores in her writing and perfor- mance work, the ancient statues of mother goddesses represent this process of embodiment, forming a material, archaeological bond with contempo

In: Religion and the Arts

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/156852910X494547 Religion and the Arts 14 (2010) 361–364 brill.nl/rart RELIGION and the ARTS Exhibitions, Conferences, Announcements Exhibitions Arts of Bengal: Wives, Mothers, Goddesses 25 November 2009–July 2010, Philadelphia Museum of Art

In: Religion and the Arts