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celebration of Apollo, who bestows the sacred prize ‘in honour of the Muses’; there follows an invocation of Artemis, the virgin huntress, and an address to Leto, who is associated with the harmonious rhythms of the Phrygian Graces, and with the cithara, the ‘mother of songs’ (μάτερ’ ὕμνων, line 124) sung by

In: The Reception of Greek Lyric Poetry in the Ancient World: Transmission, Canonization and Paratext

submissive, is set against a well-defined and exhaustively studied framework of gender biases. As young Telemachus says to his mother, Penelope ( Od . 1.358–359): 37 μῦθος δ’ ἄνδρεσσι μελήσει πᾶσι, μάλιστα δ’ ἐμοί· τοῦ γὰρ κράτος ἔστ’ ἐνὶ οἴκῳ πᾶσι, μάλιστα δ’ ἐμοί· τοῦ γὰρ κράτος

In: Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online

good reason to believe that the Cypria shared with the Iliad the same narrative pattern. The hero presumably asked Thetis to intervene in order to make it possible for him to see Helen, just as in Iliad 1 it is through the agency of his goddess-mother that he seeks his individual honour from Zeus

In: Mnemosyne

something else and shed her own Form. But after she was released, she went rushing To the home of her dear father and she was a woman again In her father’s halls. And [Sisyphus] went after her [ ]; near her mother […] the girl who was using the great loom [whom] he wished

In: Yearbook of Ancient Greek Epic Online

corollary of the orator in his own defence in the most delicate charge against himself (1.110): the accusation of having placed a suppliant’s bough in the Eleusinium (temple in Athens dedicated to the goddesses Demeter and Persephone) during the celebration of the Mysteries. There must have been an

In: A Man of Many Interests: Plutarch on Religion, Myth, and Magic

; it is the marriage ring that your father gave to me; the circle is inscribed with the royal sign and the setting is consecrated with a pantarbe stone, endowed with a secret power. Like the two goddesses at Eleusis, mother and daughter are separated by a (perceived) assault on chastity. But

In: Mnemosyne

adjective. Among many alternatives, σεμνή ( H.Dem . 1) or κυδρή ( H.Dem . 179) would forge an appropriate link between mother and daughter. The formula {foot-and-a-half-long subject + ἑτέρωθεν} (387), which occurs another 29 times in early epic, is generally followed directly by a main verb or a

In: Mnemosyne

) observes that “there is remarkably little evidence that the Pessinuntine cult of Meter Dindymene travelled”, noting MAMA VIII.363. 74) For the place of the Mother of the Gods in Athens see Borgeaud 1996, 31- 55; Parker 1996, 159-60, 188-94; Robertson 1996. Mnemo_1792_f2-534-573 11/16/2004 5:33PM Page 551

In: Mnemosyne

(Chapter III, pp. 41-51), Th e Principal God of Etruria (Chapter IV, pp. 53-70), Great Goddesses (Chapter V, pp. 71-112), More Gods (Chapter VI, pp. 113-45), Spirits (Chapter VII, pp. 147- 72), Heroes and Heroines (Chapter VIII, pp. 173-99), Foundation Myths and Legends (Chapter IX, pp. 201-7), and fi

In: Mnemosyne

occupied a place in worship as long as nature exists, long before the Olympians; with many names, different according to where she was venerated, the one great Earth Mother. Therefore also it is not surprising to find her represented so often in Minoan art; see especially Evans, Palace of Minos II, p. 809

In: Mnemosyne