Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • All: mother goddesses x
  • Ancient Philosophy x
Clear All

festival of Bendis. 9. Ibid. IV 432 c - Socrates prays for success in discovering the nature of justice. 10. Ibid. VIII 545 d-e - Socrates, to the Muses, for information on the origin of political dissension. 11. Tim. 27 b-d - Timaeus, to gods and goddesses, for a discourse pleasing to gods and men. 12

In: Phronesis

for his mother. 9 The allegorical commentary begins at the end of column VII. Col. VII itself is an introduction to the commentary. This is the Ž rst time we hear of Òa hymn saying sound and lawful things.Ó The Derveni author claims that this ÒhymnÓ needs explanation, for, as he puts it, ÒOrpheus

In: Phronesis

opening of the Catalogue of Ships in the second book of the Iliad is the locus classicus: Tell me now, Muses that dwell in the palace of Olympus - For you are goddesses, you are at hand and know all things (iste te panta) But we hear only a rumour and know nothing (oude ti idmen) Who were the captains and

In: Phronesis

prediction is fulfilled in Libation Bearers , the second play. Orestes returns from exile and kills his mother Clytemnestra and her lover Aegisthus. Again, two corpses are wheeled out of the palace and presented to the citizens; Orestes denounces Clytemnestra and Aegisthus as the murderers of his father and

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

’s supernatural intervention; however he completely deletes the idea that Achilles could be ʻbeloved by Zeusʼ, that is to tell he is in intimacy with the father of the gods. Similarly in book xxii (216/209*) the Pelides is shown as inspired by the same goddesses, but the expression ʻΔιῒ φίλοςʼ, which we find in

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

not bring them any pain, is puzzling, especially since others of their kind must die around them. In contrast, the silver generation approximates the golden generation’s bliss through a century of nursing in their mothers’ arms. Upon reaching manhood, however, their folly gives rise to woes, as their

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought