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Witches, Goddesses and Angry Spirits: The Politics of Spiritual Liberation in African Diaspora Women’s Fiction, (Ohio State University Press, 2013), a co-edited volume on Race and Displacement: Nation, Migration and Identity in the Twenty-First Century (University of Alabama Press, 2013), and a

In: Islamic Africa

architectural planes are given life by the "... warmth of energy in the contained but potentially eruptive female figures." Within the cultural milieu the author suggests that these sen- suous females are expressions of "repressed longings for the ancient worship of mother goddesses, ... " so that to Indian

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

) that the epic in South India was a Jain work (with Buddhist in- fluences), he claims that Pattini "seems to have no connection whatever with Hin- duism or Dravidian folk religion" (p. 528). In fact, her story fits the widespread pat- tern of folk goddesses in South Indian Hinduism: the chaste woman

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

and Zimbabwe. Elsewhere, we are treated to fanciful pieces of pseudo-ethnography such as: "Men worshipped their mothers like goddesses and made sacrifices to them" (p. 157); "...the consequent failure to understand many of the white man's simplest gadgets, [has] increased the tendency among the Bantu

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

ranks, salaries, publication rates, and power than their male colleagues, there is disagreement about the causes of this disparity. A prevailing view has been that family (wife/mother) duties interfere with academic roles (Kyvik, 1990; Lie, 1990; Simeone, 1987; Sutherland, 1985). However, other

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

the tribals have been slow to take advantage of the new facility. Pigs are kept in large number and are a feature in the diet. Poultry were raised for ritual sacrifice. Development agen- cies have stressed egg production under an applied nutrition program. Eggs were intended for nursing mothers and

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

freshness that inheres in an autobiography and the pleasure that it gives. The reader will be privileged to know Achebe's intuitive response to the stories told him by his sister and his mother, the ones that titillated him most, and the choice pieces that have found their way into his fictional works. The

In: Journal of Asian and African Studies

stomach would cause instant fermentation. 37 London thus suggests that this sheds light on the biblical dietary prohibition against cooking a kid in its mother’s milk (Exod 23:19; 34:26; Deut 14:21). She suggests that because the biblical statements occur in relation to seasonal festival offerings, the

In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible

further below and in Chapter Six. Second, the Nazirite, or the pregnant mother who is to dedicate her child to be a Nazirite, is expected to abstain from wine, beer and any grape products (Num 6:3–4; Judg 13:7). Both the priest and the Nazirite are set apart from ordinary people in the biblical texts, for

In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible

containers. 73 In Benin, West Africa, it has been noted that the brewing area is situated next to the main kitchen, just as beer brewing areas in the ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia were near bread making areas, and daughters will help their mothers with the different stages of beer brewing. 74 4 The Socio

In: ‘He is a Glutton and a Drunkard’. Deviant Consumption in the Hebrew Bible