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Imag(in)ing the War in Japan

Representing and Responding to Trauma in Postwar Literature and Film

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Edited by Mark Williams and David Stahl

This study of a series of artistic representations of the Asia Pacific War experience in a variety of Japanese media is premised on Walter Davis' assertion that traumatic events and experiences must be 'constituted' before they can be assimilated, integrated and understood. Arguing that the contribution of the arts to the constitution, integration and comprehension of traumatic historical events has yet to be sufficiently acknowledged or articulated, the contributors to this volume examine how various Japanese authors and other artists have drawn upon their imaginative powers to create affect-charged forms and images of the extreme violence, psychological damage and ideological contradiction surrounding the War. In so doing, they seek to further the process whereby reading and viewing audiences are encouraged to virtually engage, internalize, 'know' and respond to trauma in concrete, ethical terms.

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Louis Allen

It was Louis Allen’s work on Japan which dominated his prodigious output as a scholar, researcher and writer and which received greatest attention internationally. This collection of his writings focuses entirely on his principal fields of research, viz, Japan and the Pacific War, the post-war conflicts in Burma, Malaya and Indochina, and the immediate post-war years in the context of Japan, security and reconciliation. Importantly, in addition to the 24 essays brought together here from both known and unknown sources, we are pleased to publish for the first time Louis Allen’s own undated autobiographical paper entitled ‘Innocents Abroad: Investigating War Crimes in South-East Asia’, providing a unique, first-hand account of his war-time life and activities. This volume also includes a complete bibliography of Louis Allen’s writings covering all disciplines.

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Molly Vallor

Not Seeing Snow: Musō Soseki and Medieval Japanese Zen offers a detailed look at a crucial yet sorely neglected figure in medieval Japan. It clarifies Musō’s far-reaching significance as a Buddhist leader, waka poet, landscape designer, and political figure. In doing so, it sheds light on how elite Zen culture was formed through a complex interplay of politics, religious pedagogy and praxis, poetry, landscape design, and the concerns of institution building. The appendix contains the first complete English translation of Musō’s personal waka anthology, Shōgaku Kokushishū.