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Author: Tanya Riches

Indigenous, and non-Indigenous audiences. Magowan considers this a way to both resist the state’s co-opting of cultural symbols, and to work towards reconciliation. She states “…Indigenous dance should be examined as an expressive, active and ongoing performative dialogue with the nation” ( Magowan 2000

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

with a sound system. This also allowed them to address relational issues experienced within the community. Although conflict had occurred between the Anglicans and Pentecostals, by the time Ganggalah returned home, a reconciliation conversation had begun between local leaders in the two denominations

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

word, the seasons change. Nevertheless, many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples moved out of the acc , seeking independence. In 2010 the acc and pots had hosted a reconciliation worship service to repair the damage done by the conflict in the Torres Strait. At the point of research

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

problems with whiteness, yet advocating a compassionate response within the equalizing power dynamics of the yarn. This is considered true reconciliation by Robert Schreiter ( 1992 , 1998 , 2011 ), where a victim restores a perpetrator to healing. Such an act empowers the victim, and releases the

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

acoustic guitar. There were no other musicians in the service. The congregation was packed tightly together. For John Rutherford, an older white man, the noticeable gathered ethnicities represented reconciliation or “forgiving each other.” Pastor Edwards was a quiet and gentle dark man with a long pointy

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations
Author: Tanya Riches

reconciliation in the “secular”, as well as the contingent church transformation processes in Australian society, should be apparent. The Aboriginal pastors are at the helm of these religious voluntary associations are inevitably (slowly but surely) transforming the Australian Pentecostal Church. As participants

In: Worship and Social Engagement in Urban Aboriginal-led Australian Pentecostal Congregations