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Apartheid Literary Culture and its Aftermath
Skin Tight: Apartheid Literary Culture and its Aftermath traces the responses to the emergent paradigm of South African literary studies from the 1970s onwards. Embedded in the influential critical texts of the field, it claims, are hidden narratives - of land, race, gender, desire and embodiment. This volume explores these submerged dimension's of South African literary history and the influence they continue to exert well into the post-apartheid era. It suggests that significant continuities exist between late-apartheid and post-apartheid literary culture, and positions these against the interpretive horizon of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
Commemorative monuments, memorials and public statuary in post-apartheid South Africa
Under the aegis of the post-apartheid government, much emphasis has been placed on the transformation and democratisation of the heritage sector in South Africa since 1994. The emergent new landscape of memory relies heavily on commemorative monuments, memorials and statues aimed at reconciliation, nation-building and the creation of a shared public history. But not everyone identifies with these new symbolic markers and their associated interpretation of the past. Drawing on a number of theoretical perspectives, this book critically investigates the flourishing monument phenomenon in South Africa, the political discourses that fuel it; its impact on identity formation, its potential benefits, and most importantly its ambivalences and contradictions.

–14. Michel, L. (2009). Europe-Africa cooperation in Mali. Forced Migration Review , 32, 62–63. Mitchell, T. (Ed.). (2002). Global noise: Rap and hip hop outside the USA . Wesleyan, MA : Wesleyan University Press. Nelson, A. (2016). The social life of DNA : Race, reparations, and reconciliations after

In: African Diaspora

peacebuilding and national reconciliation. In 2015 RPA offices in Bujumbura were closed by the authorities. Both radio stations now broadcast via streaming. 3 While virtually all the Burundian refugees in Kigali were Tutsi, the vast majority of Hutu who fled the 2015 violence, settled in Tanzania. 4

In: African Diaspora

of Contemporary African Studies , 32 ( 2 ), 207 – 219. Mkodzongi G. , & Rusenga C. ( 2015 ). Land and Agrarian Reform: Towards an Inclusive Poverty Alleviation Agenda . Cape Town : Institute of Justice and Reconciliation . Moyo S. ( 2000

In: Land Reform Revisited

28 ( 8 ), 1577 – 1597 . Mkodzongi G. , & Rusenga C. ( 2015 ). Land and Agrarian Reform: Towards an Inclusive Poverty Alleviation Agenda . Cape Town : Institute of Justice and Reconciliation . Moyo S. , Jha P. , & Yeros P

In: Land Reform Revisited
Author: Tariro Kamuti

redress the imbalances of apartheid, foster national reconciliation and stability, underpin economic growth and, lastly, improve household welfare and alleviate poverty’ ( Manji 2001 , p. 330). The country’s land-reform programme set a target of redistributing 30% of commercial agricultural land by 2014

In: Land Reform Revisited

Alleviation Policy Agenda . Cape Town : Institute for Justice and Reconciliation, Transformation Audit ( 2015 ). Moyo S . ( 2007 ). The Land question in Southern Africa, a comparative review . In Ntsebeza L & Hall R, (eds) The land question in South Africa: The challenge of

In: Land Reform Revisited
Author: Chizuko Sato

, while the rest of their fellow South Africans occupied the centre-stage in nation building and national reconciliation’ ( drdlr , 2013b ). Thus, Minister Nkwinti specifically acknowledged that Khoisan have been marginalised even after 1994, and his Department was going to address that. At the same

In: Land Reform Revisited
Writers of Indian origin seldom appear in the South African literary landscape, although the participation of Indian South Africans in the anti-apartheid struggle was anything but insignificant. The collective experiences of violence and the plea for reconciliation that punctuate the rhythms of post-apartheid South Africa delineate a national script in which ethnic, class, and gender affiliations coalesce and patterns of connectedness between diverse communities are forged. Relations and Networks in South African Indian Writing brings the experience of South African Indians to the fore, demonstrating how their search for identity is an integral part of the national scene’s project of connectedness. By exploring how ‘Indianness’ is articulated in the South African national script through the works of contemporary South African Indian writers, such as Aziz Hassim, Ahmed Essop, Farida Karodia, Achmat Dangor, Shamim Sarif, Ronnie Govender, Rubendra Govender, Neelan Govender, Tholsi Mudly, Ashwin Singh, and Imraan Coovadia, along with the prison memoirists Dr Goonam and Fatima Meer, the book offers a theoretical model of South–South subjectivities that is deeply rooted in the Indian Ocean world and its cosmopolitanisms. Relations and Networks demonstrates convincingly the permeability of identity that is the marker of the Indian Ocean space, a space defined by ‘relations and networks’ established within and beyond ethnic, class, and gender categories.


CONTRIBUTORS
Isabel Alonso–Breto, M.J. Daymond, Felicity Hand, Salvador Faura, Farhad Khoyratty, Esther Pujolràs–Noguer, J. Coplen Rose, Modhumita Roy, Lindy Stiebel, Juan Miguel Zarandona