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Nathanaëlle Tressol

l’identité qui n’a jamais existé,” Diacronie 18, no. 2 (2014), document 6, http://diacronie.revues.org/1411 [accessed January 20, 2017]. 11 Alexandre Sumpf, “L’exposition russe de 1895: l’alliance se donne en spectacle,” Histoire par l’image , http

LAURENT SÉBILLOTTE and CLAIRE ROUSIER

Michel Bernard - qui propose un cursus d'étude partant de la licence en arts du spectacle, op- tion danse, jusqu'à un doctorat en esthétique, sciences et technologies des arts, option études chorégraphiques - et celui de l'Université de Nice avec la section danse du Département des arts dans la Faculté

ALEXANDER CHEPALOV

program for the scientific organization of labor (NOT). A key question being asked in the 1920s was "What kind of ballet do we need?" Answers were many and often extreme, such as Ivan Sollertinsky's comment that "we do not need any kind of ballet ... [what we do need is] a new type of synthetic spectacle

MARCUS C. LEVITT

the new dance is not. It is defined against court dance, which is characterized as entertainment, celebratory in function, and marked by sumptuousness, vari- ety, and magnificence. Court festivals are complicated, combining many dif- ferent kinds of spectacle. They are multi-media, including poetry

NANCY VAN NORMAN BAER

. Baer, A Dancer`s Legacy pp. 49-57, 75. For a discussion of folk dance influence on Nijinska's choreography, see L. Garafola, 'Choreography by Nijinska," Ballet Review (New York), 20, No. 4 (Winter 1992), 64-71. Ballets Suedois, realized his theory of theatrical spectacle based on the dynamic fusion of

ALEXANDER RUMNEV

, which was meant to serve as the finale to Voloshin's birthday in a fortnight's time. S. V. Shervinsky had written new poetry for ist, A. A. Shenshin had composed the music,8 and each of us played a role in the spectacle according to his or her ex- pertise: some sang, others acted, yet others sketched

NATALIA CHERNOVA and JOHN E. BOWLT

American prototypes. Russia's new dancers left their imprint on European and American cul- ture both openly and covertly: on the one hand, they indulged in bold public spectacle in Paris, Monte Carlo, New York, and London, sup- ported by prestigious companies and patronized by the privileged, as we learn

NICOLETTA MISLER

during the 1920s).3 For these and many other reasons, Parnakh is deserving of scholarly scrutiny. As an expert in the discipline of dance, Pamakh was well aware that the eccentric flashes and amazing fluctuations of the body on stage or in any spectacle that ruptured the classical schemas derived not

MARK KONECNY

- ning of the twentieth century, so popular that dancers from other countries took Russian stage names to share in the fame. The spectacle and inventive- ness of Sergei Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, for example, still evoke astonish- ment and delight and are the frequent subject of research and

LESLEY-ANNE SAYERS

Soviet ideas.4This view is largely in keeping with that of Jean Cocteau who castigated Massine for "turning something as great as the Russian Revolution into a cotillion- like spectacle within the intellectual grasp of ladies who pay six thousand francs for a box."5 Since the 1980s however, the growing