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Series:

Lotte Hellinga

lands. The person of Consul Joseph Smith, however, to whom the British Library owes an outstanding collection of fine books, remains largely hidden behind the vastness of his collections. The voices in their correspondence and notes, whether formal or gossipy in tone, bring to life the process of

Series:

Lotte Hellinga

Sardini and De la Serna Santander, 25 it was later supported by the Nouvelle Biographie générale (vol. 26, 1858) as well as the Biographie universelle (vol. 21, 1859) and also by Edmond Werdet (1861) and Carlo Castellani (1889). 26 The only dissenting voice so far was that of J.P.A. Madden (1873

Series:

Lotte Hellinga

lands. The person of Consul Joseph Smith, however, to whom the British Library owes an outstanding collection of fine books, remains largely hidden behind the vastness of his collections. The voices in their correspondence and notes, whether formal or gossipy in tone, bring to life the process of

Series:

Paul Bevan

Party Sprit (Amsterdam, Atlanta, GA: Rodopi, 1996), p. 31. 63 Jack Chen, “Realism for Artists,” in the Voice of China [1937]: p. 15. 64 Hu Kao, “Guanyu quanguo manhua zhanlanhui [Concerning the National Cartoon Exhibition],” in Shanghai manhua vol. 1 no. 8 (15 December 1936): unnumbered pages. 65

Series:

Paul Bevan

article for the Voice of China in which, amongst other things, he criticises Chinese artists for their slavish imitation of George Grosz. Chen vehemently upheld the view that Grosz did not “depict the positive forces of the people that will build and are building a new world.” 44 Pessimism is indeed

Series:

Simon C. Thomson

squat legs fitting the text’s description of its body as having the “eoseles gelicnesse” (“likeness of a donkey”). The text does not suggest that they sing or declaim, but attributes them with “liþelice stefne” (“a soft voice”). This follows the mention of legs like birds, and could be taken to thereby

Series:

Lotte Hellinga

Sardini and De la Serna Santander, 25 it was later supported by the Nouvelle Biographie générale (vol. 26, 1858) as well as the Biographie universelle (vol. 21, 1859) and also by Edmond Werdet (1861) and Carlo Castellani (1889). 26 The only dissenting voice so far was that of J.P.A. Madden (1873

Alison Hilton

Abstract

The strong national voice at Abramtsevo, based on a sense of harmony among native landscapes, religious and folk life, and estate culture was intrinsic to Slavic revival movements of the late nineteenth century. The estate and its surroundings were settings for Russian-themed paintings and inspired artists to seek and express a Russian “spirit of nature.” The search for a national landscape was connected with literary and intellectual culture fostered at Abramtsevo and neighboring estates, and with the presence of religious centers in the area. Local topography and collaboration among the Abramtsevo artists in the 1880s led to new ideas about a national landscape as artists ranged further afield in the next decade. Landscapes of mood and decorative works based on natural forms shifted the role of landscape from concrete subject to a source for formal experimentation.

Nathanaëlle Tressol

“Russian Years” in Paris and New Voices in Art Criticism An immediate consequence of the successful Russian section at the “Exposition Universelle” of 1900 was the quantity of critical material published in the early 1900s. The illustrated monthly L’Art décoratif , responding to public enthusiasm, turned

“In the Society’s Strong Box”

A Visual and Material History of the Royal Society’s Copley Medal, c. 1736–1760

Rebekah Higgitt

Folkes’s later relationship, see George S. Rousseau, David Haycock, “Voices Calling for Reform: The Royal Society in the Mid-Eighteenth Century – Martin Folkes, John Hill, and William Stukeley,” History of Science , 1999, 37 :377–406. As friends, see Haycock, “The Cabals of a Few” (cit. note 23), p