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Reanimating Qohelet’s Contradictory Voices

Studies of Open-Ended Discourse on Wisdom in Ecclesiastes

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Jimyung Kim

Ecclesiastes, also known as Qohelet, is a fascinating text filled with intriguing contradictions, such as wisdom’s beneficial consequences, God’s justice, and wisdom’s superiority over pleasure. Under the paradigm of modernism, the contradictions in the book have been regarded as problems to be harmonized or explained away. In Reanimating Qohelet’s Contradictory Voices, Jimyung Kim, drawing on Mikhail Bakhtin’s insights, offers an alternative reading that embraces the contradictions as they stand. For Kim, Qohelet’s or the protagonist’s contradictory consciousness is dialogically constructed by his contact with a complex web of discourses. Instead of harmonizing them or explaining them away, Kim identifies various dialogic voices available to Qohelet and demonstrates how those voices constitute Qohelet’s contradictory utterances and construct his unfinalizable identity.

Israel's Restoration

A Textual-Comparative Exploration of Ezekiel 36-39

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Ashley Crane

Commentators traditionally use a textual-critical methodology in examining Hebrew and Greek manuscripts to establish an ‘original’ reading, frequently attributing other variants to scribal error. This book proposes a complementary-textual comparative methodology that treats each Hebrew and/or Greek manuscript with equal value, listening to each voice as a possible interpretive trajectory. This methodology is applied to the restoration of Israel in Ezekiel 36-39, initially on a micro level examining each verse for intra-linguistic and trans-linguistic variants, frequently finding exegetical reasons for variants. The macro application compares Papyrus 967 with extant manuscripts, finding the different chapter order and pericope minus (36:23c-38) due to theological reasons. This comparative methodology can be used with any study dealing with different manuscripts and versions.

On Gendering Texts

Female and Male Voices in the Hebrew Bible

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Athalya Brenner and van Dijk-Hemmes

On Gendering Texts is a wonderful book in a field that demonstrates its maturity by this publication. It discusses the important and traditional issue of authorship. Whereas the idea of a unique and divinely inspired biblical author has long been abandoned, the issue of authorship itself has not.
The possibility that women might have contributed to the production of the Bible has not been taken seriously and yet the idea that everything is male unless otherwise proven is hardly acceptable. What can one do? The two authors of this book shrewdly displace the question. Rather than worrying about unprovable historical authors, they consider gender-positions; authority; gendered textuality and attributions of gender within the text; voice; world-view and ideological content. Each of these issues is important, and the gesture of raising them in connection with that of authorship alone makes this book worthwhile.
This book is both unique and in line with a growing tradition; a climatic point in the developing area of feminist biblical study. [from the Foreword by Mieke Bal]

On Gendering Texts

Female and Male Voices in the Hebrew Bible

Series:

Athalya Brenner and van Dijk-Hemmes

On Gendering Texts is a wonderful book in a field that demonstrates its maturity by this publication. It discusses the important and traditional issue of authorship. Whereas the idea of a unique and divinely inspired biblical author has long been abandoned, the issue of authorship itself has not.
The possibility that women might have contributed to the production of the Bible has not been taken seriously and yet the idea that everything is male unless otherwise proven is hardly acceptable. What can one do? The two authors of this book shrewdly displace the question. Rather than worrying about unprovable historical authors, they consider gender-positions; authority; gendered textuality and attributions of gender within the text; voice; world-view and ideological content. Each of these issues is important, and the gesture of raising them in connection with that of authorship alone makes this book worthwhile.
This book is both unique and in line with a growing tradition; a climatic point in the developing area of feminist biblical study. [from the Foreword by Mieke Bal]

The Prophetic Voice at Qumran

The Leonardo Museum Conference on the Dead Sea Scrolls, 11–12 April 2014 

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Edited by Donald W. Parry, Stephen D. Ricks and Andrew C. Skinner

Contrary to the generally held view, the Second Temple Era was not a time of prophetic dormancy, but of genuine activity, though of a different character than that of the pre-exilic age. The conference on The Prophetic Voice at Qumran, held 11–12 April 2014 at the Leonardo Museum in Salt Lake City, provided a venue for lively discussions of many of the issues connected with the question of prophecy and prophetic writings in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second Temple texts. Three of the scholars—Emanuel Tov, Eugene Ulrich, and James C. VanderKam—were featured as keynote speakers, and an even dozen scholars made presentations at the conference, of which nine are published in the present volume.

Septuagint Research

Issues and Challenges in the Study of the Greek Jewish Scriptures

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Edited by Wolfgang Kraus and Glenn Wooden

The past few decades have witnessed a renewed scholarly interest in the Septuagint, especially with regard to its importance for the fields of theology, Jewish studies, classics, philosophy, history of religions, linguistics, and history of literature. To provide students and scholars alike with ready access to the most recent developments, this collection of essays presents a comprehensive and representative picture of septuagintal research today. Specifically, this volume surveys methodological issues, thematic and book-centered studies focused on the Old Greek Septuagint translations, the use of these translations in the New Testament, and a call for the exploration of the theologies of the Septuagint as a bridge between the theologies of the Hebrew Bible and those of the New Testament. It brings together a variety of perspectives, from emerging voices to seasoned scholars, both English-speaking scholars working on the New English Translation of the Septuagint project and German-speaking scholars working on the Septuaginta Deutsch project. Besides editors Wolfgang Kraus and R. Glenn Wooden, the contributors are Patricia Ahearne-Kroll, Stephen Ahearne-Kroll, Claudia Bergmann, Cameron Boyd-Taylor, Ralph Brucker, Kristin De Troyer, Beate Ego, Heinz-Josef Fabry, Robert J. V. Hiebert, Karen H. Jobes, Martin Karrer, Siegfried Kreuzer, Albert Pietersma, Martin Rösel, Aaron Schart, Helmut Utzschneider, Wade Albert White, Florian Wilk, and Benjamin G. Wright III.

Paperback edition is available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).

Alessandro Maria Bruni

. However, it has also been suggested that LXX L does not plainly represent the OG . Doubts have been voiced mainly regarding those parts of the translation that, in virtue of a Hebraizing revision, are known commonly as the kaige sections. Moreover, the claim has been made that OG readings must be