Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 439 items for :

  • New Testament & Early Christian Writings x

Early Christian Voices

In Texts, Traditions, and Symbols. Essays in Honor of François Bovon

Series:

Edited by David Warren, Ann Graham Brock and David Pao

This collection of studies in honor of François Bovon highlights the rich diversity found within early expressions of Christianity as evidenced in ancient texts, traditions, symbols, and motifs. Old labels like "apocrypha" or "heresy" that for centuries have suppressed much of this evidence are removed, previous assumptions are questioned, and the old data are examined afresh along with the latest discoveries. The studies fall into six areas: ancient gospels, acts, early Christian movements, ancient interpretations, art, and manuscripts. Contributors include James Robinson, Helmut Koester, Harold Attridge, Karen King, and Jean-Daniel Kaestli.

Mark at the Threshold

Applying Bakhtinian Categories to Markan Characterisation

Series:

Geoff R. Webb

The discussion concerning Markan characterisation (and Markan genre) can be helpfully informed by Bakhtinian categories. This book uses the twin foci of chronotope and carnival to examine specific characters in terms of different levels of dialogue. Various passages in Mark are examined, and thresholds are noted between interindividual character-zones, and between the hearing-reader and text-voices. Several generic contacts are shown to have shaped the text’s ‘genre-memory’ – in particular, the Graeco-Roman popular literature of the ancient world. The resultant picture is of an earthy, populist Gospel whose “voices” resonate with the “vulgar” classes, and whose spirituality is refreshingly relevant to everyday concerns.

Heralds of the Good News

Isaiah and Paul in Concert in the Letter to the Romans

J. Ross Wagner

In this text-critical, literary, and theological investigation of Paul's interpretation of Isaiah in Romans, it is argued that Paul's citations and allusions evince sustained and careful attention to significant portions of Isaiah, in concert with other scriptural voices.
Through a radical rereading of Isaiah, Paul appropriates these prophetic oracles as prefigurations of his own mission to Gentiles while simultaneously appealing to Isaiah as a witness to God's continuing fidelity to Israel.
The book examines each of Paul's citations and allusions to Isaiah, situating them both within the milieu of early Jewish interpretive practices and within the context of Paul's unfolding argument in Romans. This volume contributes to the current debate about early Christian interpretation of scripture by tracing the complex and dynamic interrelationship in Paul's letter of Scripture, theology, and mission.

This publication has also been published in hardback, please click here for details.

Heralds of the Good News

Isaiah and Paul "In Concert" in the Letter to the Romans

Series:

J. Ross Wagner

In this text-critical, literary, and theological investigation of Paul's interpretation of Isaiah in Romans, it is argued that Paul's citations and allusions evince sustained and careful attention to significant portions of Isaiah, in concert with other scriptural voices.
Through a radical rereading of Isaiah, Paul appropriates these prophetic oracles as prefigurations of his own mission to Gentiles while simultaneously appealing to Isaiah as a witness to God's continuing fidelity to Israel.
The book examines each of Paul's citations and allusions to Isaiah, situating them both within the milieu of early Jewish interpretive practices and within the context of Paul's unfolding argument in Romans. This volume contributes to the current debate about early Christian interpretation of scripture by tracing the complex and dynamic interrelationship in Paul's letter of Scripture, theology, and mission.

This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.

The Strange Gospel

Narrative Design and Point of View in John

Series:

James L. Resseguie

In this literary analysis of the Gospel of John, Resseguie examines rhetoric, setting, character, and plot to uncover the Gospel’s unique point of view. He shows the usefulness of the concepts of defamiliarization and point of view for understanding how the narrator makes the familiar seem strange. A material, familiar point of view that is voiced by the dominant culture is compared with a defamiliarized, strange point of view that is expressed by Jesus and the disenfranchised. Through close readings of narrative texts, the author develops and elaborates the theological perspective of John, which emerges in the clash of differing points of view.
The introduction defines “objective” and “subjective” point of view, and shows the value of the works of Boris Uspensky and Susan Sniader Lanser for understanding the Gospel of John. In chapter one, irony, misunderstandings, and double entendres are shown to be important rhetorical tools in the Gospel’s attempt to make the familiar seem strange. Chapter two discusses point of view as it is expressed in architectural settings (sheepfold, garden, courtyard, praetorium, well, temple, and tomb) and in topographical settings (sea, mountain). Chapter three highlights the distinct points of view of Jesus, Nicodemus, religious authorities, the world, the royal official, the man at the pool, the man born blind, Mary Magdalene, Simon Peter, the beloved disciple, and Judas. Chapter four discusses the point of view that emerges from an analysis of the plot. The final chapter is a summary of the narrative’s singular point of view.
This work is a suitable introduction to a literary analysis of the Gospel of John. It makes an important contribution to narrative criticism on the Fourth Gospel in particular, and to our understanding of defamiliarization and point of view in general. The book confronts head-on habitualized and familiar ways of thinking in the ancient world and today.

On the Writing of New Testament Commentaries

Festschrift for Grant R. Osborne on the Occasion of His 70th Birthday

Series:

Edited by Stanley E. Porter and Eckhard J. Schnabel

The essays in On the Writing of New Testament Commentaries discuss historical, hermeneutical, methodological, literary, and theological questions that shape the writing of commentaries on the books of the New Testament. While these essays honor Grant R. Osborne, they also represent the first sustained effort to systematically address commentary writing in the field of New Testament studies.

Greco-Roman Culture and the New Testament

Studies Commemorating the Centennial of the Pontifical Biblical Institute

Series:

Edited by David Edward Aune and Frederick Brenk

Since a number of scholars at the Pontifical Biblical Institute have made important contributions to the study of the New Testament in the context of the Greco-Roman world, it seemed appropriate to devote this volume commemorating the centennial of the Biblicum (1909-2009) to that subject. This book contains nine essays by scholars from Europe, the United States, Australia and Jerusalem, each exploring the ways in which aspects of the New Testament can be illuminated by recourse to Greco-Roman texts.

Series:

Leif Hongisto

Applying current narrative criticism to the study of the Apocalypse, Hongisto underscores the oral nature of the narrative vis-à-vis the roles of the readers/listeners. EXPERIENCING THE APOCALYPSE AT THE LIMITS OF ALTERITY probes the interplay of meaning creation as readers/listeners encounter the narrative. The author shows how readers/listeners alike partake in the narrative design and become constructors of the narrative, given their own life experiences. Thus, the overarching reading context assists in the creation of a narrativity for the text. The form of the Apocalypse along with its imagistic quality convey a message that is not primarily cognitive, but is delivered and grasped by a sense of alterity encompassing the imaginary world of the text and the real world of the readers/listeners.