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Evina Steinova

for example R. McKitterick, ‘Carolingian Bible Production. The Tours Anomaly’, in: The Early Medieval Bible. Its Production, Decoration and Use , ed. R. Gameson (Cambridge 1994), pp. 63-77, esp. p. 76; J. Contreni, ‘The Pursuit of Knowledge in Carolingian Europe’, in: The Gentle Voices of Teachers

Marita Mathijsen

into the infinite and give voice to Satan’s curse and the melody of the angels. The true poet, which is how Van Lennep saw Vondel, is not afraid to defy the will of princes or popular sentiment. He compares Vondel with the resolute Cato, Milton and Voltaire. Even in one of his first rhymes, written at

Aron Brouwer

‘Every Frenchman must read this book’. Because of this, there are also various voices present in the textual translation. While most sections are fairly accurate, there are still some noticeable differences that might betray ideological intentions. For instance, Hitler constantly and purposely steered

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Samarpita Mitra

In Periodicals, Readers and the Making of a Modern Literary Culture: Bengal at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Samarpita Mitra studies literary periodicals as a particular print form, and reveals how their production and circulation were critical to the formation of a Bengali public sphere during the turn of the twentieth century. Given its polyphonic nature, capacity for sustaining debates and adaptability by readers with diverse reading competencies, periodicals became the preferred means for dispensing modern education and entertainment through the vernacular. The book interrogates some of the defining debates that shaped readers’ perspectives on critical social issues and explains how literary culture was envisioned as an indicator of the emergent nation. Finally it looks at the Bengali-Muslim and women’s periodicals and their readerships and argues that the presence of multiple literary voices make it impossible to speak of Bengali literary culture in any singular terms.

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Edited by Irene Zaderenko and Alberto Montaner

This volume brings together a number of distinguished scholars in the field of Poema de mio Cid studies. It provides an informed introduction to key literary aspects of the poem, and thoroughly examines many of the complex issues that are crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the work (historical context, ideological motivations, prosification in medieval chronicles, the poem’s place in the canon of Spanish literature). Equally important are the new findings that have been put forward since the 1970s, when scholars started to challenge Ramón Menéndez Pidal’s theories that had dominated the philological discourse since the beginning of the twentieth century.
Contributors are Matthew Bailey, Simon Barton, Francisco Bautista, Juan Carlos Bayo Julve, Federico Corriente, Leonardo Funes, Luis Galván, Fernando Gómez Redondo, Eukene Lacarra Lanz, Salvatore Luongo, Georges Martin, Alberto Montaner, Javier Rodríguez Molina, Mercedes Vaquero, Roger Wright, and Irene Zaderenko.

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Edited by Carme Font Paz and Nina Geerdink

Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Early Modern Europe delves into the early modern history of women’s authorship and literary production in Europe taking a material turn. The case studies included in the volume represent women writers from various European countries and comparatively reflect the nuances of their participation in a burgeoning commercial market for authors while profiting as much from patronage. From self-representation as professional writers to literary reception, the challenges of reputation, financial hardships, and relationships with editors and colleagues, the essays in this collection show from different theoretical standpoints and linguistic areas that gender biases played a far less limiting role in women’s literary writing than is commonly assumed, while they determined the relationship between moneymaking, self-representation, and publishing strategies.

The Lindisfarne Gospels

New Perspectives

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Edited by Richard Gameson

Masterpiece of medieval manuscript production and decoration, its Latin text glossed throughout in Old English, the Lindisfarne Gospels is a vital witness to the book culture, art, and Christianity of the Anglo-Saxons and their interactions with Ireland, Italy, and the wider world. The expert studies in this collection examine in turn the archaeology of Holy Island, relations between Ireland and Northumbria, early Northumbrian book culture, the relationship of the Lindisfarne Gospels to the Church universal, the canon table apparatus of the manuscript, the decoration of its Canon Tables, its systems of liturgical readings, the mathematical principles underlying the design of its carpet pages, points of comparison and contrast with the Book of Durrow, the Latin and Old English texts, the nature of the glossator’s ink, and the meaning of enigmatic words and phrases within the vernacular gloss. Approaching the material from a series of new perspectives, the contributors shed new light on numerous aspects of this magnificent manuscript, its milieux, and its significance.

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Lotte Hellinga

lands. The person of Consul Joseph Smith, however, to whom the British Library owes an outstanding collection of fine books, remains largely hidden behind the vastness of his collections. The voices in their correspondence and notes, whether formal or gossipy in tone, bring to life the process of

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Lotte Hellinga

lands. The person of Consul Joseph Smith, however, to whom the British Library owes an outstanding collection of fine books, remains largely hidden behind the vastness of his collections. The voices in their correspondence and notes, whether formal or gossipy in tone, bring to life the process of

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Alexandra Hill

foure parts: or by one voice to and instrument (London: Thomas Snodham, for Matthew Lownes, and John Browne, 1613), sig. H, eebo . ( ustc 3005506). 16 Helen Smith, ‘Grossly Material Things’: Women and Book Production in Early Modern England (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), p. 90. 17 Ibid