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Patricia Leavy

Winner! American Fiction Awards 2018 - award-winning finalist in the categories chick-lit/women's lit and inspirational fiction!

Blue follows three roommates as they navigate life and love in their post-college years. Tash Daniels, the former party girl, falls for deejay Aidan. Always attracted to the wrong guy, what happens when the right one comes along? Jason Woo, a lighthearted model on the rise, uses the club scene as his personal playground. While he’s adept at helping Tash with her personal life, how does he deal with his own when he meets a man that defies his expectations? Penelope, a reserved and earnest graduate student slips under the radar, but she has a secret no one suspects. As the characters’stories unfold, each is forced to confront their life choices or complacency and choose which version of themselves they want to be.

Blue is a novel about identity, friendship, figuring out who we are during the “in-between” phases of life, and the search for people who “get us.” The characters in Blue show how our interactions with people often bump up against backstage struggles we know nothing of. Visual art, television and film, appear as signposts throughout the narrative, providing a context for how we each come to build our sense of self in the world. With a tribute to 1980s pop culture, set against the backdrop of contemporary New York, Blue both celebrates and questions the ever-changing cultural landscape against which we live our stories, frame by frame.

Although fictional, Blue is grounded in interview research, teaching and personal observations. It can be read entirely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in women’s/gender studies, sociology, psychology, communication, popular culture, media studies, qualitative inquiry, narrative inquiry or arts-based research. The protagonist, Tash Daniels, originally appeared in the best-selling novel Low-Fat Love ( Blue is set several years later). Blue can be read as a stand-alone novel.

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Edited by Graham Cassano and Richard Dello Buono

As the first decade of the 21st century comes to a close, the world has entered a sustained period of crisis. In order to understand the forces that created our current social world, we need the tools provided by a critical sociology. This volume draws upon the work of contemporary critical sociologists searching for the roots of our present social and economic problems. Both prominent figures and emerging voices in sociology come together to offer insights into our present dilemmas from a critical perspective. The questions they ask and attempt to answer include: What is critical sociology? What is the significance of the new Obama administration? What tools do post-structuralism, postmodernism, feminism, and new forms of social theory offer critical discourse?

Family Stories, Poetry, and Women's Work

Knit Four, Frog One (Poems)

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Sandra L. Faulkner

This book is a memoir in poetry about family stories, mother-daughter relationships, women’s work, mothering, writing, family secrets, and patterns of communication in close relationships. Faulkner knits connections between a DIY (do-it-yourself) value, economics, and family culture through the use of poems and images, which present four generations of women in her family and trouble “women’s work” of mothering, cooking and crafting. Family stories anchor family culture and provide insight into relational and family life. This work may be used as a teaching tool to get us to think about the stories that we tell and don’t tell in families and the importance of how family is created, maintained, and altered in our stories. The poetry voices the themes of economic and collective family self-reliance and speaks to cultural discourses of feminist resistance and resilience, relational and personal identities. This book can be read for pleasure as a collection of poetry or used as a springboard for reflection and discussion in courses such as family communication, sociology of gender and the family, psychology of women, relational communication, and women’s studies.
Nominated: National Communication Association Ethnography Division—Best Book 2015
Nominated: OSCLG Creative Expression Award 2015
Nominated: 2016 International Association of Relationship Research Book Award
Nominated: 2016 ICQI (International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry) Qualitative Book Award

Cristián H. Ricci

New Voices of Muslim North-African Migrants in Europe captures the experience in writing of a fast growing number of individuals belonging to migrant communities in Europe. The book follows attempts to transform postcolonial literary studies into a comparative, translingual, and supranational project. Cristián H. Ricci frames Moroccan literature written in European languages within the ampler context of borderland studies. The author addresses the realm of a literature that has been practically absent from the field of postcolonial literary studies (i.e. Neerlandophone or Gay Muslim literature). The book also converses with other minor literatures and theories from Sub-Saharan Africa, as well as Asians and Latino/as in the Americas that combine histories of colonization, labor migration, and enforced exile.

Sailing in a Concrete Boat

A Teacher’s Journey

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Carl Leggo

Sailing in a Concrete Boat: A Teacher’s Journey is a novel-length narrative composed in a sequence of short fictions and poetry linked by recurring characters, themes, events, and setting. The narrative explores the experiences and emotions of a school teacher named Caleb Robinson. He teaches in a conservative church-administered school in a rural Newfoundland town called Morrow’s Cove. Caleb struggles to understand what it means to be a teacher, husband, lover, friend, father, Christian, and human being.
Sailing in a Concrete Boat raises many questions about pedagogy as questioning, freedom of expression, conservative religious beliefs, breaking silences, and curriculum as cultural reproduction instead of cultural transformation. Above all, Sailing in a Concrete Boat seeks to narrate the complex lived experiences of a school teacher as he questions love, family, community, vocation, well-being, romance, spirituality, authority, silence, truth, and identity. In order to make sense of his tangled living experiences, Caleb is always remembering and researching his past in order to write and rewrite his future.
Sailing in a Concrete Boat will be a valuable resource in both undergraduate and graduate courses in teacher education, curriculum and pedagogy, life writing, poetic inquiry, arts-based research, and narrative inquiry.

Identity, Culture and Globalization

The Annals of the International Institute of Sociology – Volume 8

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Yitzhak Sternberg

Edited by Eliezer Ben-Rafael

This book is about contemporary sociological analysis: its discussions, contradictions and controversies. Authors from various backgrounds discuss developments on all continents.
The 34 contributions are centered on six themes. The first is multiple modernities, showing us that there is no single road to the modernization of societies. The second theme is globalization, with new concepts like spatialization, world languages and new social movements. In part three, multiculturalism and diaspora movements are viewed as the pivotal factors for change in many societies. The fourth theme is the decline of the accountability of the state, concentrating on the shortcomings of traditional states and the emergence of new resources. In part five, the concept of postmodernity is discussed from the angles of identity, social reality, detachment and legacy.
Finally, the sixth part, ‘Toward a New Agenda’ looks into the future and lets sociology (or rather social knowledge) play a major part in today’s society.
This volume is a rich collection of practical examples and solid arguments by some of the best sociologists in the world.

Also available in paperback (ISBN 9004128735).

If the Truth Be Told

Accounts in Literary Forms

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Ronald J. Pelias

If the Truth Be Told: Accounts in Literary Forms plays with the sense of truth. It is composed of six chapters, “Childhood Dangers,” “Relational Logics,” “Jesus Chronicles,” “Criminal Tales,” “Aging, Illness, and Death Lessons,” and “Telling Truths.” Each chapter includes fictional and nonfictional accounts, including poems, stories, monologues, short dramas, essays, creative nonfiction, and mixed genres, to address each chapter’s subject. Pieces are based on the author’s personal experiences, newspapers accounts, and purely fictional accounts (all revealed in an appendix at the end of the book).
Moving through the book from beginning to end, readers may or may not know whether they are reading a nonfictional or fictional text. Pelias intentionally subverts assumptions readers may have in reading the different pieces in order to blur the boundaries of what counts as evidence, what might be accepted as truth, what might be of use in everyday lives. In this vein, Pelias invites readers to consider what they value and why. As an engaging compilation of literary works, this book can be read by anyone simply for pleasure.
If Truth Be Told can also be used in any number of college courses in communication, creative writing, cultural studies, ethics, narrative inquiry, philosophy, psychology, sociology and qualitative inquiry. The book includes an extensive appendix with general and chapter-by-chapter discussion questions.

Robert A. Stebbins

contact, voice projection, and vocal enunciation. The general sharing of basic techniques by the fine arts and entertainment arts fields indicates that both are skilled pursuits; to do either well requires considerable practice. Moreover, according to the definition of art set out by Thomas Munro (1957

David Horton Smith

world’s people still lacked access to social movements as a way to voice popular claims.” Yet SM s/ SMO s “do not necessarily espouse or promote democracy” (Tilly, 2004, p. 126). “From early on, relatively democratic movements regularly provoked undemocratic counter-movements….” (ibid.). Contrary to