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Editor-in-Chief Michael Peters

This is a fully Open Access journal, which means that all articles are freely available online, ensuring maximum, worldwide dissemination of content, in exchange for an Article Publication Charge. For more information visit the Brill Open dedicated webpage.

As the first-ever video journal of education and pedagogy, owned by the Association for Visual Pedagogies Inc (AVP), our aim is to initiate a new movement in education publishing. VJEP integrates visual approaches to educational research and practitioner knowledge concerning learning and teaching in its broadest sense. It facilitates the rapid spread of ideas and open access to video pedagogy demonstrations in an international and comparative context in an ‘author pays’ model that is based on institutional subscriptions. The VJEP provides a platform for cross-disciplinary research and demonstrated pedagogy while providing a ready means to capture and globally share practitioner knowledge. VJEP wants to establish a new frontier in education publishing and scientific communication and to promote the aims of the Association for Visual Pedagogies (AVP) which seeks to privilege all things visual in thought and practice.

In particular, the journal focuses on 3 main areas:

- Educational research at large, in all forms of education and pedagogy, containing a strong video/visual component. The video component must be outstanding either in the methodology, in the way data were collected, or results that are shown. This includes in particular:
o Teacher education
o Classroom teacher and child observation
o Workplace learning
oTechnology and social learning across multi-disciplinary domains of practice
- Visual approaches to educational research
o Research on new visualization methodologies
o Research and case-based studies to facilitate video data collection, dissemination, critical engagement and analysis
o Integrated approaches

- Research in visual and digital humanities, including philosophical reflection on the use of digital and visual resources in the humanities, particularly:
o Philosophical approaches in the study of visuality in education and society
o Other forms of visual pedagogy such as documentary, film and social media
o Cultural analytics, cultural studies and ethnography

VJEP will publish 10 articles per volume per year, including interviews and videos on teaching practice. The papers will be published online only at regular intervals to maintain the journal’s impact and each will have a video component. Manuscripts will be subject to a rigorous anonymous peer review process.

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

To submit your paper and proposals please contact Michael A. Peters (mpeters@bnu.edu.cn) and Jayne E. White (jayne.white@rmt.edu.au)

Association for Visual Pedagogies (AVP), in collaboration with RMIT presents the 4th international AVP conference: Ocular becoming in dangerous times: The politics of 'seeing'. Please find more information on the conference and submissions here.

Sara E. D. Wilmes, Roberto Gómez Fernández, Anna Gorges and Christina Siry

This article presents multiple episodes drawing from three distinct research projects conducted in multilingual classrooms in Luxembourg, to underscore the value of video analysis in culturally and linguistically diverse classroom contexts. We show how video analysis that valorizes the non-verbal in interaction has the ability to reveal communicative resources often masked by analysis rooted in the verbal. From the examples presented, that span teacher and student interactions in both elementary and secondary classrooms, we make a methodological argument based on analytical approaches utilized in all three research projects to demonstrate how we have come to an expanded notion of voice in our research that is revealed through multimodal video analysis. Specific analytical approaches that illuminate the embodied and multimodal aspects of voice are discussed. We conclude by underscoring the benefits of embodied and multimodal approaches to video analysis for research with all students, but most importantly for students often marginalized through analytical approaches that prioritize the verbal. Finally, we discuss the implications of video research that works to highlight resource-rich views of teaching and learning across learning contexts

Liv Kondrup Kristensen

This article proposes a methodological framework for analyzing video by adopting an embodied perspective. In order to deal with researching the complexity of human interaction that has been captured on video, structured ways for analysis are needed. In this article, the metaphor of an onion is used to conceptualize the process of unpacking the layers of observed interactions on video. Four different layers are identified: Foregrounding bodies, considering talk in combination with body, including the environment, and depth and adjustment through participant perspectives. To illustrate the process of analysis through this methodological approach, a worked example of video observations featuring classroom interaction is presented. While analysis of video through the step-by-step process in four layers is laborious, it is forcing the researcher to break with the habit of privileging talk as the base-line for analysis, sensitizing the analytical process towards non-verbal dimensions of interaction, while bringing in material dimensions, as well as the voices of participants in order to understand embodied interaction as situated activity.

E. Jayne White

This paper summons Bakhtin's principle of visual excess to the field of video research. Bakhtin's dialogic approach emphasises the visual as an effort of the eye, as well as the subjective “I”. Seeing is thus re-caste as an event where subjective and cultural boundaries are encountered, lived, and offer insight to those involved. Video is therefore posited as a visual and axiologic encounter that allows one to perceive beyond one's own limits. Here the researcher does not come with a predetermined set of categories or criteria, but seeks to encounter the form of language and the meaning of those forms, from multiple (polyphonic) visual and ideological standpoints. I argue that taking this approach opens up possibilities for seeing as an opportunity for dialogic speculation and interrogation- one that forms the basis of my research orientation. By way of demonstration the paper will introduce an example of video filmed in an infant educational setting which highlights the additional insights offered through different visual fields and their interpreted meanings. Synchronising four visual fields of the same event - from the view of the infants, teacher and researcher - visual surplus is thus operationalized as a multi-voiced polyphonic event. Dialogues concerning their pedagogical significance - for the teacher and the researcher - are discussed alongside the footage itself. Together they highlight subtle, yet highly significant potentialities for video work that set out to engage with the experience of the eye as an encounter with ‘other’. I argue that such visually oriented engagement can act as a central source of understanding and insight that far exceeds traditional approaches in educational research that view participants as mere objects for amusement or manipulation. Moreover, this approach poses a new video methodology in which meanings take precedence over what is aesthetically received.