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Re-authoring Teaching

Creating a Collaboratory

Series:

Peggy Sax

Key phrases: blended learning, insider knowledge, online pedagogy, narrative therapy, postmodern pedagogy, practitioners and consumers, practitioner-training, public practices, reflective practitioner, students’ voices, teaching congruently, teacher-practitioner, therapeutic letters, teaching therapeutic practice.
Author, Peggy Sax, PhD, is in independent practice in Middlebury, Vermont, USA, as a licensed psychologist, consultant, workshop presenter and university instructor. An enthusiastic teacher, Peggy feels privileged for opportunities to share powerful stories of learnings from over 30 years of work with families and their children, teens, adults, couples, communities and students of all ages.

More Voices from the Classroom

International Teachers' Experience with Argument-Based Inquiry

Edited by Brian Hand, Lori Norton-Meier and Jeong-yoon Jang

The intent of this book is to provide a rich and broad view of the impact of argument-based inquiry in classrooms from the perspective of the teacher. There are two important reasons for such a book. The first is that we as researchers constantly work to present our views of these experiences with the voice of the teachers only being relayed through the perspective of the researcher. We need as a community to listen to what the teachers are telling us. The second reason is that as demands grow to provide opportunities for students to pose questions, make claims, and provide evidence, that is, to think critically and reason like scientists, we need to understand what this looks like from the perspective of the teacher. This book brings together a range of teachers from several countries who have used the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach to teach argument-based inquiry. These teachers have all gone through professional development programs and successfully implemented the approach at a high level.

Series:

Yan Feng

Using autobiographical accounts acquired from her extensive career in education, the author has explored the multi-faceted influences on teacher career motivation and professional development in special and inclusive education in China.
The social realities faced by teachers in their professional lives in a city in China have been highlighted through comparison and contrast with those of their international peers. This is achieved through a comprehensive review of recent literature and an empirical study to encourage teacher voices with this regard. The study reveals opportunities and challenges in China in the process of moving towards inclusive education. In particular, it identifies the impact of teacher recruitment policies, teacher education programmes, education decentralisation, rural-urban disparities as well as socio-cultural values on teacher career motivation and their professional development. It also addresses various implications regarding ethical dilemmas overlooked in previous educational research. Meanwhile, the author proposes a discussion on Self-Determination Theory in terms of motivational change.

Unsuited

How We Can Reject Conventional Career Advice and Find Empowerment

Series:

Ryan Clements

Current school systems create a generation of students who experience institutional practices that honor other students’ needs—those students who share the values of those with power—and have pathologized other groups, specifically women of color. (In) Visible Presence intends to contribute to existing pedagogy, which empowers students, teachers, administrators, and policy makers to develop participatory membership in schools and among citizens who can begin to create an anti-oppressive society. (In) Visible Presence contains a holistic, thematic approach to exploring young adult (YA) novels written by women of color, while providing cultural and historical contexts for interpreting and analyzing their work through a feminist lens. Unlike other scholarship, (In) Visible Presence uses a feminist theoretical framework to create a space in which select literary works offer counter-narratives that can be analyzed and critically interpreted according to principles and ideas intended to validate women, thus making their triumph over racism, sexism, classism, and heterosexism and equity challenges a visible cause relegating consequential change for both young girls and women of color. (In) Visible Presence maintains current discourse dialogue through a concentration on the intersectionality of gender, race, and class identities and how these identifiers serve as criteria for privilege and marginalization, even in YA literature.
(In) Visible Presence aims to explore YA literature written by women of color represented by African American, Asian American, Indian American, and Latina Americans. Our theoretical perspective focuses on the connection of race, gender, and class that is exclusive to women of color. The construction of “voice” and “space” is important for readers to hear from those once silenced.

Bridging between Research and Practice

Supporting Professional Development through Collaborative Studies of Classroom Teaching with Technology

Series:

Sara Hennessy

This book presents a fresh approach to bridging the perceived gap between academic and classroom cultures. It describes a unique form of research partnership whereby Cambridge University academics and school teachers together grappled with and reformulated theory—through in-depth case studies analysing practice using interactive whiteboards in five subject areas. The inquiry exploited the collaborators’ complementary professional knowledge bases. Teachers’ voices are particularly audible in co-authored case study chapters. Outcomes included deeper insights into concepts of sociocultural learning theory and classroom dialogue, more analytical mindsets, sustained new practices and ways of working collegially.
The book reflects upon the power of lesson video review and details how the co-inquirers negotiated “ intermediate theory”—bridging educational theory and specific settings—framed in mutually accessible language and embodied in interactive multimedia resources for teacher development. These include video clips, analytic commentary from multiple perspectives, lesson materials, plus optional prompts for reflection and critique—not models of “best practice”. The resources make pedagogy explicit and vividly illustrate the book’s ideas, offering theory-informed yet practical tools designed with and for practitioners. Hennessy and colleagues have tested a model of ongoing, teacher-led development and innovation, professional dialogue and classroom trialing stimulated by discussing selected multimedia resources.

Growing as a Teacher

Goals and Pathways of Ongoing Teacher Learning

Series:

Clive Beck and Clare Kosnik

Teacher learning doesn’t end with initial preparation; many insights and skills remain to be added. This book is concerned with ongoing teacher learning, its goals (Part I) and pathways (Part II). It is based on a longitudinal study of 42 teachers: 20 over their first 8 years of teaching and 22 over their first 5 years.
The areas of continued teacher learning identified in our study were: vision of teaching, program planning, assessment, relevance, subject content and pedagogy, classroom organization and community, inclusion, and professional identity. The pathways of learning included informal and formal PD, teacher inquiry, and school-based learning.
A key finding of our research was that, over the years, teachers learn a great deal informally. However, they do so largely on their own and under considerable stress. Teachers need more support than they currently receive, both for survival and to enhance their informal learning.

Series:

Lisa M. Bell and Jill M. Aldridge

The issue of teacher quality is increasingly seen as being central to education policy development and this emphasis highlights the role teacher professional development plays in improving teacher effectiveness and the quality of learning in the classroom.

This book describes a large-scale research program which investigated the feasibility of using student perceptual measures as the basis for teacher development and classroom improvement. The book describes how teachers’ use of the student feedback, as part of an action-research process, was used to guide improvements to their respective classrooms which in turn provided them with increased opportunities for teacher development and growth. In addition to this, it reports the efforts of one school which purposefully linked the involvement of their teachers to their school improvement initiatives.

This book would be of interest to a range of audiences including researchers, teachers and school leaders. Its attractions include its far-reaching implications for educational systems concerning the ways in which student feedback can be used to facilitate teacher development and growth. The book also reports the use of a multi-method research design in which quantitative and qualitative methods were successfully employed simultaneously within two concurrent and interrelated investigations.

Sense and Sensitivity

The Identity of the Scholar-Writer in Academia

Series:

Hanna Ezer

The study described in this book is a qualitative phenomenological research study whose objective was to reveal the writer’s identity of teacher educators in academia and to discover how they express this identity in their teaching practice. Twenty-three academic scholars were interviewed for the study.
The research findings indicate that the identity of the writer is complex, incorporating three interwoven aspects: a cognitive aspect, an emotional aspect and a sociocultural aspect.
The cognitive aspect finds expression in the writer’s awareness and understanding of the medium of writing, which explicitly and openly entails the production of ideas while writing. This process is fundamentally rhizomatic in that it moves in different directions, each time beginning anew from a different point, and is ultimately geared toward a multidirectional and multilayered product.
The emotional aspect in the writer’s life is somewhat mystical in nature. It is a medium that surrounds writers at all times and enables them to find their voice and their place in the world. The writing workspace is perceived as part of this aspect. It is a sanctuary that provides inspiration, is designed according to the writer’s needs and shapes the writing.
The sociocultural aspect shapes the identity of the writer and highlights social mirroring as part of the writer’s positioning in life and in the professional community.

Series:

Holly J. Thornton

The impact a teacher has on students may be profound and lasting. Thus, teacher preparation is grounded in standards to assure that all teacher candidates know the content and have the skills needed to become good teachers. What makes a teacher great? The answer is not clear-cut or easily measured with tests. But we all know a great teacher when we see one. The best teachers have an It Factor that sets them apart from others. It is seemingly intangible and unteachable, as it’s often said that, “Some people are just born to be teachers.” This book challenges that assumption and uncovers the It Factor. Teacher and student voices helped to develop language and tools to examine how teachers are disposed to think and act and how this affects student learning. If we can identify what makes teachers great, we can teach it.

Students have a sea of information, opinions and messaging at their fingertips. They find themselves navigating through a myriad of facts and “alternative facts.” Opinions, beliefs, and fallacies share the same platform and status as well grounded information and vetted ideas, fueling tensions among individuals and distance between groups. Developing students who are caring, critical thinkers and problem-solvers may be more important now than ever. The teachers who are right for this challenge have more than content knowledge and teaching skills. To meet this challenge, teachers need to have “It,” that something inside that makes them not just good teachers, but great ones.

Career Moves

Mentoring for Women Advancing Their Career and Leadership in Academia

Edited by Athena Vongalis-Macrow

Mentoring and career guidance are the missing ingredients in women’s career planning at the higher education level. This book recognizes and gives voice to some of the common career concerns of women in higher education and responds to these through well informed, researched and experiential chapters focussing on interests specific to women in academia.
Career Moves is an international collection of book chapters that explore a range of specific issues that all women in higher education face or will face as they move up the career ladder. The book follows a career trajectory from new academics, middle academics and senior academics, in order to provide specific mentoring advice thatwill be useful, practical and essential for all women contemplating a career in higher education.

The book draws on the substantial knowledge, experience and information of successful women currently working in higher education. Each chapter presents strategic information for academics working in higher education who may be seeking insider’s advice about negotiating their careers. The authors, as ‘mentors’, reflect, discuss and offer critical learning to the readers. The aim is to help guide and shape women’s career moves in higher education.
In this international edition authors have given personal accounts of what works and how women could prepare for the next stages of their academic careers. Authors have given sociological accounts of obstacles and how these can impede women if they are not aware of strategies to overcome barriers. Insights about successful mentoring programs are highlighted to provide possible models for organizations.