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  • Languages and Linguistics x

Aorist voice patterns in the diachrony of Greek

The New Testament as a sample of Koine

Liana Tronci

1 Introduction This paper deals with the verbal category of voice in Koine Greek and focuses on the aorist. As Browning (1983) and Horrocks (2010) pointed out, the aorist underwent major changes in voice from Ancient to Modern Greek: “the endings of the aorist middle (-(σ

A Functional Account of Marathi's Voice Phenomena

Passives and Causatives in Marathi

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Prashant Pardeshi

A Functional Account of Marathi's Voice Phenomena offers a comprehensive account of the formal and semantic aspects of the two most prominent voice phenomena in Marathi: the passive and the causative. Previous studies offer many partial insights into various aspects of Marathi’s passives and causatives. However, a comprehensive description of the formal, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of Marathi’s passives and causatives as not been available so far. Attempting to fill this gap, the present monograph offers a description in the functional-typological framework. At the same time it introduces the reader to the rich tradition of grammatical studies in Marathi, which up to now have remained inaccessible to those who are unfamiliar with the language.

The Grammar of Perspective

The Sumerian Conjugation Prefixes as a System of Voice

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Christopher Woods

The so-called Sumerian conjugation prefixes are the most poorly understood and perplexing elements of Sumerian verbal morphology. Approaching the problem from a functional-typological perspective and basing the analysis upon semantics, Professor Woods argues that these elements, in their primary function, constitute a system of grammatical voice, in which the active voice is set against the middle voice. The latter is represented by heavy and light markers that differ with respect to focus and emphasis. As a system of grammatical voice, the conjugation prefixes provided Sumerian speakers with a linguistic means of altering the perspective from which events may be viewed, giving speakers a series of options for better approximating in language the infinitely graded spectrum of human conceptualization and experience.

"Woods is to be commended for establishing a new precedent for analyzing Sumerian grammar which will hopefully become a model for future studies of the language."
Paul Delnero, Johns Hopkins University

Avi Mizrachi

In Modern Israeli Hebrew, adjacent obstruents that differ in underlying voicing are often realized with the same voicing. This process, known as voicing assimilation , is regressive, as the first obstruent assimilates to the obstruent following it. In Hebrew, voicing assimilation is optional

Rutger Allan

The verbal grammatical category of voice pertains to the relationship between syntactic roles (subject, direct object) and semantic roles (agent, patient, experiencer, beneficiary, recipient). Ancient Greek has three morphologically distinct voice categories. The active voice is marked by act

David Goldstein

Voicing refers to an assimilative process by which a voiceless sound becomes voiced; the term can also be used in reference to the feature [voice], which involves vibration of the vocal cords. Voicing is a process whereby a consonant changes from voiceless to voiced (the reverse is called devoicing

Rina Kreitman

Voicing is present when vibration of vocal folds occurs during the production of a segment (vocal folds and vocal cords are used here interchangeably). If the vocal folds vibrate, the segment is voiced, but if they are open and air flows freely with no vibration, the segment is voiceless

Conrad’s Narrative Voice

Stylistic Aspects of His Fiction

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Werner Senn

Werner Senn’s Conrad’s Narrative Voice draws on the methodology of linguistic stylistics and the analysis of narrative discourse to discuss Joseph Conrad’s perception of the role and the limitations of language. Tracing recurrent linguistic patterns allows Senn to demonstrate that Conrad’s view of the radical indeterminacy of the world is conveyed on the most basic levels of the author’s (often criticised) verbal style but permeates his work at all levels of the narrative. Detailed stylistic analysis also reveals the importance, to Conrad, of the spoken word, of oral communication. Senn argues that the narrators’ compulsive efforts to make their readers see and understand reflect Conrad’s ethics of human solidarity in a world he depicts as hostile, enigmatic and often senseless.

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Edited by Le-Ha Phan and Bradley Baurain

This volume aims to provide insights into the process of knowledge construction in EFL/ESL writing - from classrooms to research sites, from the dilemmas and risks NNEST student writers experience in the pursuit of true agency to the confusions and conflicts academics experience in their own writing practices. Knowledge construction as discussed in this volume is discussed from individualist, collectivist, cross-cultural, methodological, pedagogical, educational, sociocultural and political perspectives. The volume features a diverse array of methodologies and perspectives to sift, problematise, interrogate and challenge current practice and prevailing writing and publishing subcultures. In this spirit, this volume wishes to break new ground and open up fresh avenues for exploration, reflection, knowledge construction, and evolving voices.

Finding a Voice

Problems of Language in East German Society and Culture

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Edited by Graham Jackman and Ian F. Roe

Finding a Voice explores aspects of the use and function of language in East Germany which resulted from Party control of public discourse during the period of the German Democratic Republic. A distinctive feature of the volume, which brings together essays by British and German scholars, is the wide variety of areas which are incorporated in this survey - from political and public discourse, through aspects of sociolinguistics and the teaching of German, to a spectrum of artistic forms ranging from rock music and film to poetry and the novel. In particular, the relationship between public discourse and the events of the ‘Wende' is explored in a number of contributions. Most of the works and issues considered are discussed in English here for the first time, and the volume as a whole should be of interest to scholars concerned with the GDR and with contemporary German culture, to undergraduate and postgraduate students, and also to others interested in the history and culture of Germany since 1945. Nine of the essays are in English and four in German.