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Between Text and Self
The autobiographical turn in biblical criticism reveals the interpreter’s “I” and reclaims it as an essential critical category, issuing a challenge to traditional, “objective” criticism. Pioneers in the field have contributed essays both practical and theoretical. They offer stimulating autobiographical re-readings of Hebrew Bible and New Testament texts, and address hermeneutical issues that are at stake in this young field of criticism.
The Pastoral Uses of a Biblical Narrative (c. 1200–1550)
In the Mirror of the Prodigal Son provides a comprehensive history of the function of the parable of the prodigal son in shaping religious identity in medieval and Reformation Europe. By investigating a wealth of primary sources, the book reveals the interaction between commentaries, sermons, religious plays, and images as a decisive factor in the increasing popularity of the prodigal son. Pietro Delcorno highlights the ingenious and multifaceted uses of the parable within pastoral activities and shows the pervasive presence of the Bible in medieval communication. The prodigal son narrative became the ideal story to convey a discourse about sin and penance, grace and salvation. In this way, the parable was established as the paradigmatic biography of any believer.
The essays in The Origins of John’s Gospel, gathered by Stanley E. Porter and Hughson T. Ong, either survey or discuss in detail various areas and topics in Johannine scholarship, especially in the study of John’s Gospel. These include the authorship and dating, sources, and traditions of John’s Gospel, its structure and composition, the Johannine community, and Johannine anti-Judaism and the Son of Man sayings. Collectively, these essays offer important contributions to various areas and topics of research relating to the origins of John’s Gospel.