Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • History of Linguistics & Philosophy of Language x
Clear All
Analysed against the Background of Platonic and Stoic Dialectics
Both the Thunder: Perfect Mind (NHC VI,2) and the Trimorphic Protennoia (NHC XIII,1) present their readers with goddesses who descend in such auditive terms as sound, voice, and word. In Linguistic Manifestations in the Trimorphic Protennoia and the Thunder: Perfect Mind, Tilde Bak Halvgaard argues that these presentations reflect a philosophical discussion about the nature of words and names, utterances and language, as well as the relationship between language and reality, inspired especially by Platonic and Stoic dialectics.
Her analysis of these linguistic manifestations against the background of ancient philosophy of language offers many new insights into the structure of the two texts and the paradoxical sayings of the Thunder: Perfect Mind.
Selected Papers from the Fifth International Bakhtin Conference University of Manchester, July 1991

authoritativeness therefore concerns the author’s voice, which includes aspects of his/her social position, opinions and beliefs, as well as his/her alignment with the logico-rhetorical conventions of their discourse community. Legitimization in discourse involves conceptual as well as linguistic aspects which can

In: International Review of Pragmatics

Rendtorff used in 1971 to describe the fundamental challenge facing Protestant theology in the modern age. 1 Since the late seventeenth century, the criticism of the Holy Scriptures and of church dogma voiced by German Protestant university theologians has become ever more radical. Against literalism and

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany

Voice of Poetry in the Conversation of Mankind’, in Rationalism in Politics and Other Essays (London: Methuen, 1962), pp. 197–247. 2 Thomas Albert Howard, Protestant Theology and the Making of the Modern German University (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006); Zachary Purvis, Theology and the

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany

seems to organize members of pairs or -tuples of linguistic elements in terms of primacy. The paradigm is strongest in phonology, where, for instance, voiceless segments (e.g. [s], [t], [f], [k]) are unmarked relative to their voiced counterparts ([z], [d], [v], [g], respectively). But it extends to

In: International Review of Pragmatics

narration; the sequence of events is transformed into a plot; outstanding characters are given ideational motivations, while the voice of the author steps back; and the whole is symbolically condensed in decisive situations or in salient details even if they seem to be incidental. Moreover, historicism can

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany

media genres. As for private individuals, this group obtains remarkable scores of SPU object usage in news programs (24 %), in which they often participate by invitation. Their discourse is generally oriented to explicitly argumentative interaction, having to voice their views and concerns about a

In: International Review of Pragmatics

cooperate or set new projects in motion, however, Wilamowitz sometimes was sceptical and voiced opposition to a suggestion. This also applies to projects favoured by the otherwise adored Theodor Mommsen. The edition of the Codex Theodosianus , the project of the compilation of all Greek coins, and the

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany

, 23 should not, however, obscure the fact that Nietzsche achieved his own philosophical-critical voice when he broke with the protocols of philological inquiry. This break is achieved, of course, in his Birth of Tragedy (1772) and my contention in this section of the chapter is that we can extract

In: Doing Humanities in Nineteenth-Century Germany