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Author: Ka-Chai Tam
In Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks, Ka-chai Tam argues that the prefectural judge in the judiciary of the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) became crucial to upholding justice in Chinese society.

In light of two late Ming casebooks, namely the Mengshui zhai cundu (盟水齋存牘) by Yan Junyan and the Zheyu xinyu (折獄新語) by Li Qing, Ka-chai Tam demonstrates that the late Ming judges handled their cases with a high level of consistency in judicial reasoning and practice in every type of case, despite their differing regions and literary styles. Equipped with relative institutional independence and growing professionalism, they played an indispensable role in checking and guaranteeing the legal performance of their subordinate magistrates.
Author: Ka-chai Tam

The prefectural judge in the provincial judiciary of late-Ming China was a powerful post responsible for maintaining the quality of justice. Under the mutual, multi-layered and open review system of the Ming judiciary, when reviewing court cases the prefectural judges could even challenge the

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

prefectural judges, were a new type of publication developed from the specific legal, educational, and official instating arrangements of Ming China. In this chapter, the development of the Chinese casebooks up to the publication of the main foci of this study, namely, the Mengshui zhai cundu and the Zheyu

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

institutional conditions mentioned above, the introduction in the late Wanli era of the reformed pan 判, or judicial ruling, section in the second paper of the civil service examination also played a significant role in the emergence of judicial casebooks in late-Ming China. After some struggle to determine

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

the accuser, who was often advised by litigation masters proficient at seizing the attention and sympathy of the judge and other potential readers. Incidentally, the twenty cases presented here show us an authentic and representative picture of maritime society on the Chinese coast in the early

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

and literary styles. The key question underlying this study is how judicial practice of the courts of prefectural judges and the legal interactions among different levels of official-judges of the provincial judiciary in late-Ming China were demonstrated in the era’s judicial casebooks, with

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

addition, the interactions among the regional inspectors, other superior provincial officials, and the prefectural judges with regard to the quality of justice in the provinces will be explored. 1 Development of the tuiguan Post in Late Imperial China Unfortunately, not a single reference to the

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
Author: Ka-chai Tam

general public had begun to develop a close interest in legal affairs and court cases, both for practical purposes and for amusement, probably marking the first time in Chinese history that both the literati and a general readership showed a keen interest in reading judicial literature. An unprecedented

In: Justice in Print: Discovering Prefectural Judges and Their Judicial Consistency in Late-Ming Casebooks
A unique collection of 36 chapters on the history of Chinese medical illustrations, this volume will take the reader on a remarkable journey from the imaging of a classical medicine to instructional manuals for bone-setting, to advertising and comic books of the Yellow Emperor. In putting images, their power and their travels at the centre of the analysis, this volume reveals many new and exciting dimensions to the history of medicine and embodiment, and challenges eurocentric histories. At a broader philosophical level, it challenges historians of science to rethink the epistemologies and materialities of knowledge transmission. There are studies by senior scholars from Asia, Europe and the Americas as well as emerging scholars working at the cutting edge of their fields.

Thanks to generous support of the Wellcome Trust, this volume is available in Open Access.
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine
In: Imagining Chinese Medicine