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(Thailand), Cambodia, Tonkin, Cochinchina, China, and Japan. In ancient times, it was known too among the Gauls and Druids. It is, indeed, a “monstrous doctrine” that had been commonly taught by various heretical groups in the earliest days of Christianity, and that had thus plagued the early church

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

To shed light on the place of the Society of Jesus in early modernity’s pioneering era of globalization, this essay reflects on some sixteenth- to eighteenth-century Jesuit critiques of rebirth (reincarnation, metempsychosis), drawing examples from the Japanese, Chinese, and Indian contexts. 1

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

seventeenth century. Let us begin with a few observations on de Nobili and on the Taittirīya Upaniṣad . 2 Roberto de Nobili Though not nearly as well known (or well studied by modern scholars) as Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), the pioneering Jesuit missionary to China of the late sixteenth century, de

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

what should and could happen everywhere. De Nobili went beyond this traditional praise of the classical by proposing that places such as India and China also had classical societies that could appropriately receive the Christian Gospel while remaining intact and whole. He saw in south India a

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

normally call “religion” and “religions” were classified. De Nobili was neither the first nor the only Jesuit missionary to reflect on religions in terms of idolatry. 13 Earlier Jesuits (e.g., Matteo Ricci [1552–1610] in China, and José de Acosta [1540–1600] in Peru) 14 and contemporary Jesuits

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

more broadly in the global context. 1 Jesuit missionary scholars were many, including figures such as José de Acosta (1540–1600) (Peru), Alessandro Valignano (1539–1606) (Japan), Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) (China), Roberto de Nobili (1577–1656) (India), Alexandre de Rhodes (1591–1660) (Vietnam), and

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India
Author: Andrew Davies

.-K . 2017 . “ City Harvest Church of Singapore: An Ecclesial Paradigm for Pentecostalism in the Postmodern World .” In F. Yang , J.K.C. Tang and A.H. Anderson , eds, Global Chinese Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity . Leiden : Brill , 286 – 308 . Chong

In: Handbook of Megachurches
Author: Stephen Hunt

. Megachurches in China are, again, to be found in a very different environment and of a different structure. One of the smaller house church networks in southern China has an attendance of 400,000, larger networks number several million and constitute a form of underground Christianity – and these are networks

In: Handbook of Megachurches

percent Chinese, 2 percent Japanese, and 1 percent Black. Among the staff of Canadian large churches 46 percent were hired from within the congregation. As evangelical pastors age, however, only 57 percent of the respondents indicated that they have a succession plan underway that they believe could be

In: Handbook of Megachurches

, in addition to an English language service, a Chinese service and a Vietnamese service, for example. They have also offered services in Armenian since 2013. Bethany (Krasnodar) has services in Russian and Armenian. All Russian megachurches emphasise how important weekly small group meetings are to

In: Handbook of Megachurches
Exploration, trade and conquest expanded and upset traditional worldviews of early modern Europeans. Christians saw themselves confronted with a largely heathen world. In the wake of Iberian colonization, Jesuits successfully christianized heathen populations overseas. In his De conversione Indorum et gentilium, Johannes Hoornbeeck presents a systematic overview of every aspect of the missionary imperative from a Reformed Protestant perspective. The most attractive part of his book may be the global survey it offers of the various types of heathens, an early example of comparative religion. Of equal interest, however, is his critical approach to mission. Hoornbeeck rejects ecclesiastical hierarchy and top-down imposition of Christianity. In this he is perfectly orthodox, and at the same time startlingly original and a harbinger of modern missions. His practical recommendations offer a flexible framework for missionaries, to fit a wide variety of circumstances.
Editor-in-Chief: Peggy Brock
Series Editors: James Grayson and David Maxwell
The Online Collection of the book series Studies in Christian Mission. The series publishes monographs and edited volumes about the entire history of mission from the 16th century onwards. It covers all Christian denominations such as Roman Catholic, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox and Evangelical/Pentecostal missionary work.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.
Interdisciplinary Studies in Universal and Local Expressions of the Christian Faith 
Volume Editors: Joel Cabrita, David Maxwell, and Emma Wild-Wood
Existing scholarship on World Christianities tends to privilege the local and the regional. In addition to offering an explanation for this tendency, the editors and contributors of this volume also offer a new perspective. An Introduction, Afterword and case-studies argue for the importance of transregional connections in the study of Christianity worldwide. Returning to an older post-war conception of ‘World Christianity’ as an international, ecumenical fellowship, the present volume aims to highlight the universalist, globalising aspirations of many Christians worldwide. While we do not neglect the importance of the local, our aim is to give due weight to the significant transregional networks and exchanges that have constituted Christian communities, both historically and in the present day.

Contributors are: J. Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu, Naures Atto, Joel Cabrita, Pedro Feitoza, David C. Kirkpatrick, Chandra Mallampalli, David Maxwell, Dorottya Nagy, Peter C. Phan, Andrew Preston, Joel Robbins, Chloe Starr, Charlotte Walker-Said, Emma Wild-Wood.

The Social Lives and Networks of Minnan Protestants, 1840s-1920s
Author: Chris White
In Sacred Webs, historian Chris White demonstrates how Chinese Protestants in Minnan, or the southern half of Fujian Province, fractured social ties and constructed and utilized new networks through churches, which served as nodes linking individuals into larger Protestant communities. Through analyzing missionary archives, local church reports, and available Chinese records, Sacred Webs depicts Christianity as a Chinese religion and Minnan Protestants as laying claim to both a Christian faith and a Chinese cultural heritage.
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In: Relocating World Christianity
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In A Reformed Voice in the Ecumemenical Discussion Martien E. Brinkman offers a critical account of the main international ecumenical developments of the last three decades. He delivers a sketch of the Reformed contribution to the ecumenical dialogues dealing with issues like contextuality, state-church relations, the ethical implications of baptism, the church as sacrament of the kingdom and apostolic tradition.

He pleas for a stronger non-Western input in the ecumenical discussions and emphasizes that in many contexts (Indonesia, India, China) the interreligious dialogue has become part of the inner-Christian dialogue. This study can be considered as a constructive contribution to the development of a hermeneutics of tradition and puts itself the critical question what is lost and found in translation.