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Author: Paul Shore

they produced martyrs) in a way that provoked the ire of its rivals. In addition, a complex series of events that became known as the “Chinese Rites Controversy” had reached a climax more than half a century before the breve of suppression dealt a serious blow to the Society and provided its enemies

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

. Fabro was “so moved” by this sword that he decided to dedicate himself to missionary work. Fabro went on to serve twenty-seven years in China, all the while severely disciplining himself. This priest restricted his food intake and dressed in such inadequate clothing that he had to endure cold that made

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

persist—Jesuits in China, for example, did not seek to disrupt converts’ participation in rites honoring Confucius (552–479 BCE )—elicited criticism from other orders. But Jesuits in both Asia and New France worked among self-governing peoples possessed of cultural and spiritual riches and military and

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

(Thailand), Cambodia, Tonkin, Cochinchina, China, and Japan. In ancient times, it was known too among the Gauls and Druids. It is, indeed, a “monstrous doctrine” that had been commonly taught by various heretical groups in the earliest days of Christianity, and that had thus plagued the early church

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

To shed light on the place of the Society of Jesus in early modernity’s pioneering era of globalization, this essay reflects on some sixteenth- to eighteenth-century Jesuit critiques of rebirth (reincarnation, metempsychosis), drawing examples from the Japanese, Chinese, and Indian contexts. 1

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

seventeenth century. Let us begin with a few observations on de Nobili and on the Taittirīya Upaniṣad . 2 Roberto de Nobili Though not nearly as well known (or well studied by modern scholars) as Matteo Ricci (1552–1610), the pioneering Jesuit missionary to China of the late sixteenth century, de

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

what should and could happen everywhere. De Nobili went beyond this traditional praise of the classical by proposing that places such as India and China also had classical societies that could appropriately receive the Christian Gospel while remaining intact and whole. He saw in south India a

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

normally call “religion” and “religions” were classified. De Nobili was neither the first nor the only Jesuit missionary to reflect on religions in terms of idolatry. 13 Earlier Jesuits (e.g., Matteo Ricci [1552–1610] in China, and José de Acosta [1540–1600] in Peru) 14 and contemporary Jesuits

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India

more broadly in the global context. 1 Jesuit missionary scholars were many, including figures such as José de Acosta (1540–1600) (Peru), Alessandro Valignano (1539–1606) (Japan), Matteo Ricci (1552–1610) (China), Roberto de Nobili (1577–1656) (India), Alexandre de Rhodes (1591–1660) (Vietnam), and

In: Western Jesuit Scholars in India
Author: Andrew Davies

.-K . 2017 . “ City Harvest Church of Singapore: An Ecclesial Paradigm for Pentecostalism in the Postmodern World .” In F. Yang , J.K.C. Tang and A.H. Anderson , eds, Global Chinese Pentecostal and Charismatic Christianity . Leiden : Brill , 286 – 308 . Chong

In: Handbook of Megachurches
Author: Stephen Hunt

. Megachurches in China are, again, to be found in a very different environment and of a different structure. One of the smaller house church networks in southern China has an attendance of 400,000, larger networks number several million and constitute a form of underground Christianity – and these are networks

In: Handbook of Megachurches

percent Chinese, 2 percent Japanese, and 1 percent Black. Among the staff of Canadian large churches 46 percent were hired from within the congregation. As evangelical pastors age, however, only 57 percent of the respondents indicated that they have a succession plan underway that they believe could be

In: Handbook of Megachurches

, in addition to an English language service, a Chinese service and a Vietnamese service, for example. They have also offered services in Armenian since 2013. Bethany (Krasnodar) has services in Russian and Armenian. All Russian megachurches emphasise how important weekly small group meetings are to

In: Handbook of Megachurches

quality of its men, the mission was in better shape than some of the provinces (e.g., China). Acquaviva had set up the prefecture for the good of the Catholic Church, the Society, and the mission. The current attempt at dismantlement unwittingly allied the congregation with the English government, the

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Author: Agustín Udías

scientific knowledge, especially astronomy, to China and India, as well as their pioneering work of presenting the flora, fauna, and geography of the newly discovered countries of America to a European audience for the very first time. Although some Jesuits were able to continue their work after the

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

assimilation of the Iberian eastern realms, both Spanish and Portuguese. 17 The Chinese empire’s resistance to trading with the Spanish on the continent and the refusal of the Muslim sultans to abandon the Moluccas (Spice Islands) and Mindanao put a damper on the Habsburgs’ plans for expansion in East Asia

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Exploration, trade and conquest expanded and upset traditional worldviews of early modern Europeans. Christians saw themselves confronted with a largely heathen world. In the wake of Iberian colonization, Jesuits successfully christianized heathen populations overseas. In his De conversione Indorum et gentilium, Johannes Hoornbeeck presents a systematic overview of every aspect of the missionary imperative from a Reformed Protestant perspective. The most attractive part of his book may be the global survey it offers of the various types of heathens, an early example of comparative religion. Of equal interest, however, is his critical approach to mission. Hoornbeeck rejects ecclesiastical hierarchy and top-down imposition of Christianity. In this he is perfectly orthodox, and at the same time startlingly original and a harbinger of modern missions. His practical recommendations offer a flexible framework for missionaries, to fit a wide variety of circumstances.
Author: Ainur Elmgren

race” as their offspring. 86 Finnish women’s relationships with foreigners, including Russian soldiers and sailors and Chinese workers during the First World War, but also any other imaginable nationalities, was a common moral concern for left- and right-wing press before, during, and after the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Jean-Paul Wiest

Translated by Afinogenov Gregory. Chestnut Hill: Institute of Jesuits Sources, Boston College, 2016. Pp. 116. Hb, $30. The Jesuit mission in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century China has been the subject of many studies. These embrace a wide range of sources: the correspondence and books the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Hilmar M. Pabel

out the Chinese words for God that the Jesuits found acceptable, Friedrich notes without elaboration that Jesuits initially quarrelled about “these aspects” of Christian vocabulary (511). In his Commentarium in bullam Pauli iii , Licet ab initio , published in 1750 and then proscribed, Giovanni

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

vocations. In the case of the Jesuit mission in China, selected letters were printed from the beginning of the seventeenth century. However, most of the letters still extant in different archives remained unpublished. It was not until the twentieth century that scholars attempted to retrieve systematically

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Howard Louthan

political role, their involvement in the Chinese rites controversy, and their interaction with Jewish communities are all briefly considered. There are some Jesuits such as Francisco Suárez and Robert Bellarmine, who receive significant attention while others such as Francis Xavier are skipped over

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

’s I modi (Venice: clandestine 2 nd ed., 1527) to address the very different attitudes the Japanese had toward pornography in comparison to the Italians. Dawn Odell contextualizes two illustrations of beautiful Chinese women that appeared in Athanasius Kircher S.J.’s China monumentis (Amsterdam

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Paul Rule

Studies in Christian Mission, volume 50. Leiden: Brill, 2017. Pp. xvi + 300. Hb, $147. From the editor’s introduction it appears that this volume arose out of an academic meeting and it bears the marks of its origin in its diversity. The contributions are mainly on “China’s Christianity” (a nice

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

stand on their own but remained in dynamic relationship to their European origins and sponsors. This was a two-way street. Just as they continued to be affected by Europe, Europe felt their impact upon itself, as was especially clear regarding the Jesuits in China. Finally, in the past twenty years has

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

) is also missing. We have included studies about education, architecture, music, and missions to China, as well as Jesuit literary works, both in Polish and in Latin. They show both the universal and the particular elements of the activities of Polish Jesuits. Sadly, a chapter about one of the most

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

, Macao’s Church of St. Paul: A Glimmer of the Baroque in China (Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press, 2009), explored the first church constructed by Jesuit missionaries in Macao—the church of the Madre de Deus, also known as St. Paul, built in the seventeenth century under the direction of the Italian

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

There were only four Polish Jesuit missionaries 1 preaching the word of God in China in the seventeenth and the eighteenth century. Despite their small number, Polish priests left their mark on the history of the religious, scientific, and even political relations between Europe and Asia. Each

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

Paris: Honoré Champion, 2017. Pp. 493. Pb, €75,85. For the past half century, scholars of the Jesuits’ China mission in the early modern period have concentrated their analyses on its intellectual aspects. The fascination with intercultural dialogue is understandable, as is the concern with

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
A survey of the latest scholarship on Catholic missions between the 16th and 18th centuries, this collection of fourteen essays by historians from eight countries offers not only a global view of the organization, finances, personnel, and history of Catholic missions to the Americas, Africa, and Asia, but also the complex political, cultural, and religious contexts of the missionary fields.
The conquests and colonization of the Americas presented a different stage for the drama of evangelization in contrast to that of Africa and Asia: the inhospitable landscape of Africa, the implacable Islamic societies of the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires, and the self-assured regimes of Ming-Qing China, Nguyen dynasty Vietnam, and Tokugawa Japan.

Contributors are Tara Alberts, Mark Z. Christensen, Dominique Deslandres, R. Po-chia Hsia, Aliocha Maldavsky, Anne McGinness, Christoph Nebgen, Adina Ruiu, Alan Strathern, M. Antoni J. Üçerler, Fred Vermote, Guillermo Wilde, Christian Windler, and Ines Zupanov.
Editor-in-Chief: Peggy Brock
Series Editors: James Grayson and David Maxwell
The Online Collection of the book series Studies in Christian Mission. The series publishes monographs and edited volumes about the entire history of mission from the 16th century onwards. It covers all Christian denominations such as Roman Catholic, Protestant, Eastern Orthodox and Evangelical/Pentecostal missionary work.

The title list and free MARC records are available for download here.