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Volume Editors: Martha Frederiks and Dorottya Nagy
World Christianity publications proliferate but the issue of methodology has received little attention. World Christianity: Methodological Considerations addresses this lacuna and explores the methodological ramifications of the World Christianity turn. In twelve chapters scholars from various academic backgrounds (anthropology, religious studies, history, missiology, intercultural studies, theology, and patristics) as well as of multiple cultural and national belongings investigate methodological issues (e.g. methods, use of sources, choosing a unit of analysis, terminology, conceptual categories,) relevant to World Christianity debates. In a closing chapter the editors Frederiks and Nagy converge the findings and sketch the outlines of what they coin as a ‘World Christianity approach’, a multidisciplinary and multiple perspective approach to study Christianity/ies’ plurality and diversity in past and present.
Author: Paul Shore

they produced martyrs) in a way that provoked the ire of its rivals. In addition, a complex series of events that became known as the “Chinese Rites Controversy” had reached a climax more than half a century before the breve of suppression dealt a serious blow to the Society and provided its enemies

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

. Fabro was “so moved” by this sword that he decided to dedicate himself to missionary work. Fabro went on to serve twenty-seven years in China, all the while severely disciplining himself. This priest restricted his food intake and dressed in such inadequate clothing that he had to endure cold that made

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

Lars Peter Laaman and Joseph Tse-Hei Lee (eds), The Church as Safe Haven. Christian Governance in China (Leiden: Brill, 2018) xv + 330 pp. ISBN 978-90-04-38373-9 (hardback). Price: € 143,00. Also available as eBook. The Church as Safe Haven , edited by Lars Peter Laaman and Joseph Tse

In: Exchange
Author: Michael Kirwan

“sacrificially.” Its irrevocable destruction of the earth’s resources constitutes a “crescendo towards paroxysm,” destined to escalate in the struggle for global economic domination between the United States and China. This paroxysm is structurally similar to that of the Cold War and is likewise to be read in

In: Theology and the Political

evangelicalism through the lens of J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets . 2 Authoritarianism and the Abhorrent Alliance The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, as well as China’s economic reforms beginning in the 1970s and culminating in joining the World Trade Organization in

In: Theology and the Political

. Chan , Joseph . “ A Confucian Perspective on Human Rights for Contemporary China .” In The East Asia Challenge for Human Rights , edited by Joanne Bauer and Daniel Bell , 212 – 237 . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 1999 . Clapsis , Emmanuel . “ The Holy Spirit in the

In: Theology and the Political

, the European powers divided the old “Middle Kingdom,” China, among themselves. Then came the first World War and the European nations destroyed each other. They lost their empires in Africa and Asia in World War II . Today, the European nations have put their imperial delusion behind them and the

In: Theology and the Political

communities in the caliphate. Because of this, for example, Patriarch Timothy I of the Church of the East ordered the establishment of new six ecclesiastical parishes and promoted missionary work to India, China, Turkestan, Yemen and Tibet. See also Wilhelm Baum and Dietmar W. Winkler, Die apostolische

In: After-Mission, Beyond Evangelicalism

tabula rasa on which one can write Christianity and science. To become Christian and civilized, the people must become like us. As the Chinese used to say, ‘one more Christian, one less Chinese’. 25 In the context of the Middle East, the Chinese saying becomes: ‘One more Christian’ (not ‘one more

In: After-Mission, Beyond Evangelicalism

instance, how did a Christian-minority movement in say, China, fare compared to a Christian-majority country like the United Kingdom? Or, comparing religions—how did Muslim communities react to the virus compared to Hindu? Along with demographers, we are interested to see how the pandemic might change

In: Journal of Religion and Demography
Author: Daniel L. Chen

1 Introduction Gender violence is a human rights issue and a public health problem ( IPPF ). 1 40% of Chinese women experience unwanted sex or sex acts (Kew 2004). 25% of young South African women’s first sexual experience was forced (Epstein 2004). In the US, roughly one in five girls

In: Journal of Religion and Demography

2020). 3 Religions in Asia Historically, most of Asia’s population was Chinese folk-religionist or Buddhist, but by 2020 only 21.7% of the continent adhered to either of these traditions (see table 3). Ethnoreligionists have fallen steadily as a percentage of Asia’s population, from 4.3% in

In: Journal of Religion and Demography

) countries such as China (De Sherbinin and Mara 2018). Consistent with game theory, research has revealed that individuals who adhered to a religion-based belief in doomsday or end-of-times scenarios (and implicit short time horizon) are less likely to support efforts to address climate change (Barker and

In: Journal of Religion and Demography
Author: Darren Carlson

Peter 1:1). Yang’s research among Chinese immigrants who converted to Christianity found that migration increased a sense of homelessness. 16 Migrants easily identify and understand what it means to be what the KJV translates παρεπιδήµοις as “strangers.” All the privileges of being a child of God are

In: Christianity and Conversion among Migrants
Author: Darren Carlson

. Shop signs were in Arabic and Farsi. Around the corner was a small Chinatown, its street lined with multiple Chinese importers and a few Chinese restaurants. Nearby, a Chinese church met on Sunday mornings and held various programs during the week. The small sidewalks were always filled with people

In: Christianity and Conversion among Migrants
Author: Darren Carlson

situated because almost all migrants coming into Europe enter through Greece and almost none of them intend to stay in the country. Greece has the longest coastline in Europe, about 16,000 km, which is longer than China’s. Its proximity to Turkey, with a shared border and just kilometers from multiple

In: Christianity and Conversion among Migrants
Author: Darren Carlson

Pentecostal churches, made up primarily of Romanians, Filipinos, Koreans, Chinese, Persians, Afghans, and African French, Arabic, and English speakers. Specific data were gathered to attempt to find the religious backgrounds of migrants in refugee centers, as well as to track conversions, specifically from

In: Christianity and Conversion among Migrants
Author: Darren Carlson

lost her 18-year old brother to this type of recruitment; he was killed in Syria. 39 Afghan migrants come from as far away as the eastern border of China to as close as eastern Iran, where the majority of Afghan families living in Iran have resided since the war with the former Soviet Union. Some

In: Christianity and Conversion among Migrants

across denominational boundaries within one and the same missionary institution were a frequent occurence in China. However, in Egypt, the various evangelical missions under study appear to have gone on working separately, mostly within defined denominational boundaries. As a result, their

In: Social Sciences and Missions
Volume Editors: Alexander Chow and Emma Wild-Wood
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. They provide a way of examining changes in World Christianity. Taking their lead from the internationally acclaimed research of Brian Stanley, in whose honour this book is published, contributors examine the entangled nature of ecumenism and independency in the modern global history of Christianity. They show how the scrutiny afforded by the attention to local, contextual approaches to Christianity outside the western world, may inform and enrich the attention to transnational connectivity.
Author: Leo D. Lefebure

to the United States and wrote a dissertation about constructing an ethical home community. In an evocative essay, Jane Naomi Iwamura imagines the possibility and impossibility of the scene, “When Buddha and Jesus Danced,” in the movie, Eve and the Fire Horse , in which a young Chinese Canadian

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity

scholars’ work, and as such, foreign to people in the world beyond Europe. For example, the so-called “Buddhism”, “Confucianism”, and “Taoism” have existed and flourished in China for millennia. However, there was traditionally no concept of religion in China that distinguishes itself from other social

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity

. 8 In the construction of Confucian monotheistic theology, Tian (the Chinese term for heaven) came to be understood as the Confucian equivalent of “the One and the Only God”. However, Tian is not a personal God with attributes familiar to monotheism. 9 Michel Picard, ‘From Agama Hindu

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity

The Early Buddho-Daoist Encounter as Interreligious Learning in the Chinese Context: a Case in Comparative Theology  184 Fu Yu Being Theological in a Comparative Manner in Today’s Indonesia  197 Albertus Bagus Laksana Salvation Through Saving Others: toward

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity
Author: Fu Yu

boundaries, and given the fact that Christian theologians are generally more interested in comparison than others, one wonders whether it is viable to do comparative theology in the Chinese context. Is not the word “theology” inapplicable to Chinese religions? In the wake of the adoption of the term, do we

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity

geographical location of comparative theology to seven countries (Australia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Singapore, South Korea). I will now review each of the essays briefly. Anita Ray’s provides us with context and also brings to the fore the opportunity to learn from the Indigenous peoples of

In: International Journal of Asian Christianity

China. Composed of nine chapters, the collection begins with a concise introductory essay by Cindy Yik-yi Chu, exploring the thematic categories of Catholic worshippers, church leaders, ecclesiastical institutions, and grassroots communities as analytical windows onto larger political, sociocultural