Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 100 of 448 items for :

  • All: chinese x
  • Type: Major Reference Work x
  • History of Religion x
  • Religious Studies x
Clear All Modify Search

from heaven’, suddenly triggered by a near-death experience when he was travelling in China (Crowley, The Confessions , 516). 100 Crowley, The Equinox of the Gods , 61. I am indebted to Egil Asprem for highlighting this point. The ‘destruction of the world by Fire’ is envisaged as having

In: Aries
Author: Deja Whitehouse

her in astronomy and astrology, mysticism, Yoga, geometry, algebra, history, literature, chemistry and what not’. 51 Harris, with ‘neither Latin or Greek … no classical education, indeed no education’, 52 tackled the Greek and Hebrew alphabets, the kabbalah, and the Chinese I Ching, or Yi King

In: Aries

was a collaborative effort. We shall thus consider Knorr to be its sole author. 1 Mingjun-Lu, The Chinese Impact upon English Renaissance Literature: A Globalization and Liberal Cosmopolitan Approach to Donne and Milton (London: Routledge, 2015): pp. 89–92 used here. For his

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity

futuri [30] sint participes juxta Rom. 11, 26. Unde & Nomina illorum inscripta erant 3 portis Novæ 4 Hierosolymæ 5 Ap. 21, 12. Sive dicamus decem tribus alicubi superesse adhuc 6 , ut in America seu 7 meridionali; in China & in planitie quadam Persiæ inter asperimos montes sita; sive Animas illarum

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity
Author: Keith Cantú

instead that China, Japan, India, Rome, “Arabo-Muslim,” and numerous other societies had endowed themselves with such an art. Urban seems to follow this line of reasoning, framing Reuss’s complex in the Western concept of transgression as rooted in the framework of confession and its punishment (Foucault

In: New Approaches to the Study of Esotericism

’s philosophy of history, in which the “spirit” ( Geist ) originated in China and moved to India, Persia, Egypt, and Greece until “the Germanic spirit ( germanische Geist ) is the spirit of the New World ( neuen Welt )” (Dussel, 1995, p. 23). The Mexican model of prisca theologia was based, like its

In: New Approaches to the Study of Esotericism
Author: Justine Bakker

they have faces like other people. You said one was like a redheaded Irishman. BARNEY : (Describing the scene very slowly and carefully.) His eyes were slanted. Oh-his eyes were slanted! But not like a Chinese. (p. 92) These exchanges thus demonstrate that thinking about extraterrestrials very

In: New Approaches to the Study of Esotericism
Author: J. Sage Elwell

, etc. In the new online environment, all of these issues become contentious.” 58 However, Mori’s work reveals that the eighth-century Chinese religious practice of prayer and devotion to Kichijōten itself involved technology in the form of a wish-giving jewel just as modern technology might be used to

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts
Author: Liana Saif

the ninth century presents it as “containing Andalusia, the lands of the Slavs, Byzantines, Franks, and Tangier till the borders of Egypt” (Ibn Khordābeh, 1889, p. 155). Islamic cultures of “the east” considered themselves as of the “west” in relation to South East Asia through to China when trade

In: New Approaches to the Study of Esotericism

Goop’s “featured experts” (habitually representatives of alternative or naturopathic medicine), Shiva Rose. Rose called the jade eggs “the strictly guarded secret of Chinese royalty in antiquity,” used by queens and concubines to help their relationships with emperors. 1 Through harnessing the power

In: New Approaches to the Study of Esotericism
Author: Nathan Hofer

, Matthew S. , The traveling waqf. Property, religion, and mobility beyond China , ILS 35 ( 2018 ): 121 – 155 . Ernst , Carl W. , Eternal garden. Mysticism, history, and politics at a South Asian Sufi center , Albany 1992 . Ernst , Carl W. and Bruce B. Lawrence , Sufi

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Semih Ceyhan

shaykh (Tahralı). The Baghdad-based Suhrawardiyya spread in the regions of Syria, Iran, China, Turkestan, Iraq, and especially India (Sobieroj). The order is usually ascribed to Abū Ḥafṣ Shihāb al-Dīn ʿUmar al-Suhrawardī (d. 632/1234), but some Ṣūfī authors suggested that the order began with Abū l

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Mark Sedgwick

the Shādhiliyya were found everywhere from Morocco to China, day-to-day leadership passed to the local level, and sub-orders came into being, for example, the Jazūliyya Shādhiliyya, named after the Moroccan walī Muḥammad al-Jazūlī (d. 869/1465) (Bencheneb). Sub-orders, too, fragmented over time; for

In: Sufi Institutions

widely than any other ṭarīqa . By the ninth/fifteenth century, the Qādiriyya had branches in the Middle East, the Maghrib, Iberia, the Indian subcontinent, the horn of Africa, and Mali, and by the tenth/sixteenth, it had reached China and present-day Indonesia. The landscape of the Qādiriyya can thus be

In: Sufi Institutions

lodge in the oases of the Tarim Basin, the Khwājas’/Khojas’ groups extended their reach as far as the Chinese frontier (Weismann, Naqshbandiyya , 81–2; Papas, Soufisme et politique , 51–86, 139–56). In the late twelfth/eighteenth century, Ṣūfī lodges and saints’ tombs and shrines dotted the

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Knut S. Vikør

as the chief shaykh of the Naqshbandiyya ṭarīqa in the region. His successors ruled Kashgar, using the titles of pādishāh, khān , and töre (tribal leader; Togan, Islam in a changing society, 140), until the Chinese conquered it in the 1750s. 1.2 The Ṣafavids By the time the Kashgar

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Alexandre Papas

’s bondsmen from origin to return, esp. part 5, ch. 1–3) by the Kubrawī master Dāya Rāzī (d. 654/1256) was also written in Persian then translated into Arabic and even Chinese. This work offered kings, ministers, and deputies guidance on the spiritual path. Another Kubrawī, Sayyid ʿAlī Hamadānī (d. 786

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: David Cook

Ṣūfī servicemen in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Awadh (northwestern Uttar Pradesh) who served as soldiers in the cold season and as pious mystics in the hot season (Papas, 127, 131, 135). The Naqshbandiyya also heavily influenced the resistance of Turkic Muslims to Chinese rule during the

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Nathalie Clayer

intellectuals who denounced Ṣūfī lodges as places that condoned laziness, the consumption of drugs, etc. In fact, reformist Ṣūfīs themselves advocated, in one way or another, the adaptation to “modernity.” This was the case, for example, of the Xidaotang, a Ṣūfī group in northwest China that, at the turn of the

In: Sufi Institutions
Author: Alexandre Papas

subcontinent, Central Asia, and Anatolia, and China, marginally), the collection of almost seventy chapters opened new avenues of research, mainly, though not exclusively, into the intellectual history of Sufism, thanks to many detailed studies focusing on original and heretofore unexplored works of various

In: Sufi Institutions

, and not only during the Youth Day festivities. The symptoms of the “impending war” were acknowledged, i.e. the prelude to a world war in the form of clashes between Japan and China and the Civil War in Spain (in which Tsukunft actively rooted for the Popular Front). Tsukunft ironically spoke out

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies
Author: J. H. Chajes

Zukav’s attempt to facilitate the introduction of his readers to the new physics by means of a gentle Chinese-inflected poetics, Ginsburgh’s goal is chiefly the assertion of the supremacy of Kabbalistic diagnostication and treatment. Given his position, we might have expected Ginsburgh to present his

In: European Journal of Jewish Studies
Author: Mark Sedgwick

Sufism, as was the case with Schuon and the general norm in Europe and North America, but with T’ai chi ch’üan (Tàijí quá), the Chinese martial arts practice, a combination found nowhere else. The Academia Kan-Non was founded and run by Michel Veber (1926–2003) and his wife Ismenia, both friends of

In: Aries

about the history of non-Muslims, contains the sacred history prior to the Prophet, an analysis of India, geographical data about seas and rivers, China, the tribes of Turkey, a list of the kings of Mesopotamia, Persia, Greece, Rome, Byzantium and Egypt, and chapters about black people, Slavs, Gauls and

In: Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion

Shogunate in Japan, and the empire of the Qing dynasty in China. For Russia see Sergei Bogatyrev, “Ivan IV” in Maureen Perrie (ed.), The Cambridge History of Russia, vol. I: From Early Rus’ to 1689 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), pp. 240–63; for Japan during the early Edo period, see Asao

In: Virtue, Piety and the Law

well as the wider Islamic world, from the Arabian peninsula to the Indian subcontinent, Russian Tatarstan and Chinese Turkestan, Europe and North America, his figure has assumed a place in a trans-historically imagined line of admonishers and pietists, sunna -minded scholars and activists alike, from

In: Virtue, Piety and the Law