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from Middle Persian tahm “strong”; cf. D. Durkin-Meisterernst, Dictionary of Manichaean Texts . Vol. 3: Texts from Central Asia and China . Part 1: Dictionary of Manichaean Middle Persian and Parthian (Corpus Fontium Manichaeorum, Subsidia; Turnhout: Brepols, 2004), 323b. (D.N. MacKenzie, A

In: Syriac Hagiography

was a collaborative effort. We shall thus consider Knorr to be its sole author. 1 Mingjun-Lu, The Chinese Impact upon English Renaissance Literature: A Globalization and Liberal Cosmopolitan Approach to Donne and Milton (London: Routledge, 2015): pp. 89–92 used here. For his

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity

futuri [30] sint participes juxta Rom. 11, 26. Unde & Nomina illorum inscripta erant 3 portis Novæ 4 Hierosolymæ 5 Ap. 21, 12. Sive dicamus decem tribus alicubi superesse adhuc 6 , ut in America seu 7 meridionali; in China & in planitie quadam Persiæ inter asperimos montes sita; sive Animas illarum

In: Messias Puer: Christian Knorr von Rosenroth’s Lost Exegesis of Kabbalistic Christianity

Mani’s Pictures: The Didactic Images of the Manichaeans from Sasanian Mesopotamia to Uygur Central Asia and Tang-Ming China . Nag Hammadi and Manichaean Studies 90. Leiden: Brill. Hill, J. Hamlyn 2001 The Earliest Life of Christ Ever Compiled from the Four

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

in Syriac: First Editions, New Editions, and Studies . CFM , Series Syriaca  I. Turnhout, 245–267. Gulácsi, Z. (2016): Mani’s Pictures. The Didactic Images of the Manichaeans from Sasanian Mesopotamia to Uygur Central Asia and Tang-Ming China . NHMS  90. Leiden, Boston

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Mattias Brand

.N.C. Lieu, Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China , 2nd edition ed. (Tübingen Mohr Siebeck, 1992), 86–120. 17 I. Gardner, The Founder of Manichaeism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2020), 58. 18 For more references to the Greek use of the term, see S. Daris, Il Lessico Latino

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Dylan M. Burns

. Lieu, Samuel N.C. Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China . Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 63. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1992. Marjanen, Antti. “The Seven Women Disciples in the Two Versions of the First Apocalypse of James .” Pages 535

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

material in Chinese, Turkic, and Latin. 7 Nils Arne Pedersen leads the Project, where participants also are Claudia Leurini (in charge of the Iranian sources), John Møller Larsen (the Semitic sources), and myself (the Coptic and Greek sources). 8 The Gospel of Thomas -appendix lists six quotations and

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity

College Press, 1991), 35–55. 3 See Samuel Lieu, Manichaeism in Mesopotamia and the Roman East (Leiden: Brill, 1994), 80 f. 4 See Samuel Lieu’s discussion of Diocletian’s response to Manichaeism in his Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China: A Historical Survey

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
Author: Therese Fuhrer

.), Die Tücke des Objekts (Berlin) 230–249. Lieu (1992): Samuel N.C. Lieu, Manichaeism in the Later Roman Empire and Medieval China (Tübingen). Mayer (1986–1994): Cornelius Mayer, ‘Allegoria’, Augustinus-Lexikon 1, coll. 234

In: Manichaeism and Early Christianity
This book represents the first monograph-length study of the relationship between Protestant Bible translation and the development of Mandarin from a lingua franca into the national language of China. Drawing on both published and unpublished sources, this book looks into the translation, publication, circulation and use of the Mandarin Bible in late Qing and Republican China, and sets out how the Mandarin Bible contributed to the standardization and enrichment of Mandarin. It also illustrates that the Mandarin Union Version, published in 1919, was involved in promoting Mandarin as not only the standard medium of communication but also a marker of national identity among the Chinese people, thus playing a role in the nation-building of modern China.
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
In: Protestant Bible Translation and Mandarin as the National Language of China
Online Reference Tool for the History of Culture
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