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Author: Litian Swen
Jesuit Mission and Submission explains how the Jesuits entered the Manchu world after the Manchus conquered Beijing in 1644. Supported by Qing court archives, the book discovers the Jesuits’ Manchu-style master-slave relationship with the Kangxi emperor. Against the backdrop of this relationship, the book reconstructs the back and forth negotiations between Kangxi and the Holy See regarding Chinese Rites Controversy (1705-1721), and shows that the Jesuits, although a group of foreign priests, had close access to Kangxi and were a trusted part of the Imperial circle. This book also redefines the rise and fall of the Christian mission in the early Qing court through key events, such as the Calendar Case and Yongzheng’s prohibition of Christianity.
Author: Paul Shore

they produced martyrs) in a way that provoked the ire of its rivals. In addition, a complex series of events that became known as the “Chinese Rites Controversy” had reached a climax more than half a century before the breve of suppression dealt a serious blow to the Society and provided its enemies

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

. Fabro was “so moved” by this sword that he decided to dedicate himself to missionary work. Fabro went on to serve twenty-seven years in China, all the while severely disciplining himself. This priest restricted his food intake and dressed in such inadequate clothing that he had to endure cold that made

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

. Fabro was “so moved” by this sword that he decided to dedicate himself to missionary work. Fabro went on to serve twenty-seven years in China, all the while severely disciplining himself. This priest restricted his food intake and dressed in such inadequate clothing that he had to endure cold that made

In: An Overview of the Pre-suppression Society of Jesus in Spain
Author: David Emmett

assemblies in Switzerland’ and an aunt had been a missionary with the China Inland Mission ( cim ) for twenty years ‘and barely escaped with her life during the Boxer Riots of 1900’. 19 Another aunt, Frederica Edith Padwick, gave Burton a leather-bound Newberry Bible on his twenty-first birthday. She

In: W.F.P. Burton (1886-1971): A Pentecostal Pioneer's Missional Vision for Congo
Author: David Emmett

China from 1895–1903), while making the case for both indigenous, self-supporting missionaries and self-governing churches espoused the notion that ‘many of our best men are locked up in strategic centres’. 186 Fiedler sees Allen as receiving ‘common veneration’ from all Pentecostals. 187

In: W.F.P. Burton (1886-1971): A Pentecostal Pioneer's Missional Vision for Congo

Ages,” in: Elizabeth Kefallinos (ed.), Thinking Diversely: Hellenism and the Challenge of Globalisation (special edition of Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand) , 2012), pp. 91-108; Ken Parry, “Byzantine-Rite Christians (Melkites) in Central Asia and China and Their Contacts with the

In: Scrinium
Author: Dino Jakušić

religion under the domain of the natural light, and distrusted Wolff for the atheism and fatalism suspected to result from his apparent acceptance of Leibniz’ pre-established harmony. 11 Gloves apparently came off after Wolff’s 1721 speech entitled “On the practical philosophy of the Chinese,” in which he

In: Church History and Religious Culture

, government regulation of religion reduces overall competition between identities, thereby lowering rates of overall participation. Examples of this phenomenon drawn from locales from China to North America that span the many religious traditions of these diverse lands and peoples are presented in the

In: Church History and Religious Culture
Author: Seija Jalagin

Evangelical Lutheran Mission ( FELM ). It is a mainstream Lutheran mission and a long-time co-operative organization with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, 5 as well as the largest development co-operation body in Finland. It has historically operated in Southwest Africa (from 1870) and in China

In: Christian Missions and Humanitarianism in The Middle East, 1850-1950

as India and China. Yet in the last few decades, faith-based NGO  s have banked on their religious nature to bolster their credibility: religious values have been publicized as a guarantee of reliability and of autonomy vis-à-vis major donors. 3 Does the religious nature of the organizations

In: Christian Missions and Humanitarianism in The Middle East, 1850-1950
Author: Michael Marten

heavy artillery that medical missions were used above all: in the less responsive fields, in Islamic societies, and above all in China”. 33 Walls’ analysis of the development of medical missions in turn highlights four distinct factors: the imitative (direct obedience to Jesus, who healed people and

In: Christian Missions and Humanitarianism in The Middle East, 1850-1950

Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall, 1477–1806 (Oxford: Oxford Clarendon Press, 1995), 367–372; Willem Frijhoff, “The State, the Churches, Sociability, and Folk Belief in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic,” in Religion and the Early Modern State: Views from China, Russia, and the West , eds

In: Synopsis Purioris Theologiae / Synopsis of a Purer Theology  

opening in the Transparente of Toledo Cathedral (by Narciso Tomé, 1732) or the false domes painted by Andrea Pozzo and his students on Jesuit church ceilings from Rome to China. 20 Villancicos with “synesthetic” topics mismatch the senses in the spirit of paradox and enigma. 21 For example

In: Hearing Faith

Vol. 2: September 1706–December 1707 . Edited by Paul Rule and Claudia von Collani. Leiden: Brill, 2019. Pp. 811. Hb, $239.00. Publications analyzing China’s rites controversy that troubled the Roman Catholic mission during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries have continued unabated

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Sheila J. Rabin

-Jesuit missionaries in China following the suppression of the order as their main source of information about ancient Chinese civilization. While this volume is not specifically devoted to the scientific contributions of the Jesuits in the early modern period, it demonstrates once again that we cannot fully

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

globalization. In fact, the key impetus behind the vast mining enterprises that monetized and lubricated the global economy, Hausberger suggests, was not simply China’s and Europe’s demand for silver but rather Spanish American elites’ demand for European and Chinese luxury goods. Deploying a similarly global

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Miles Pattenden

Levant. 28 He was heavily involved around the same time in the papal response to the so-called Chinese Rites controversy—Leibniz’s correspondence with Des Bosses contains numerous references to this—and various pamphlets in the Vienna State Library published in 1709–10 would seem to represent the

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

eighteenth century. The translation of Amiot’s text, which functions as chapters two and three in the book, is clear and informative. The biography of Amiot includes useful background information on Amiot’s life, education, and work in China. This review, however, will focus on Parr’s explanatory essays

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies
Author: Joanna Dales

. British Quakers established presences in Madagascar and in Palestine, and were active in China and in Russia. 120 Whereas Quaker missionary work in Africa was carried out mainly by American evangelical Quakers, British Quakers generally took India as their particular province. The liberalization of

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Quaker Studies

total of over nine million murdered heretics, we pass to the Vatican Council which up to the present represents a unique attempt to assert a merciless uniform spiritual belief: one form, one compulsory dogma, and one rite, identically for Nordics, Levantines, negroes, Chinese, and Eskimos.” 58

In: A Companion to Boniface

Pope Gregory supported the Jesuits as he made good use them, charging them to run the newly established English College in Rome and sending them to evangelise China and Japan. 63 In return for this service, the pope funded the Society’s Collegio Romano and Collegio Germanico in Rome and confirmed and

In: Between Popes, Inquisitors and Princes

the Roof of the World. Ippolito Desideri’s Mission to Tibet (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010); Laven, Mission to China: Matteo Ricci and the Jesuit encounter with the East (London: Faber, 2012) and Po-Chia Hsia, A Jesuit in the Forbidden City: Matteo Ricci 1552–1610 (Oxford: Oxford

In: Between Popes, Inquisitors and Princes

persist—Jesuits in China, for example, did not seek to disrupt converts’ participation in rites honoring Confucius (552–479 BCE )—elicited criticism from other orders. But Jesuits in both Asia and New France worked among self-governing peoples possessed of cultural and spiritual riches and military and

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies

persist—Jesuits in China, for example, did not seek to disrupt converts’ participation in rites honoring Confucius (552–479 BCE )—elicited criticism from other orders. But Jesuits in both Asia and New France worked among self-governing peoples possessed of cultural and spiritual riches and military and

In: Jesuits in the North American Colonies and the United States
Author: Diego Lucci

and tradition. His research on this subject benefited from an intellectual network consisting of Italian bibliographers and mathematicians, German and Scandinavian antiquarians, Jesuit scholars based in Europe, and Jesuit missionaries in Iran, India, and China. The Jesuits of China were particularly

In: Journal of Jesuit Studies

, even though they had many overlapping ideas. They probably could have accomplished more in collaboration. One of the papers that was not written for this issue was about the relations between the Jesuits and the Dominicans in their missions to China. To reason no one wanted to touch it is that our