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Edited by Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett, Silke Ackermann and Ryan Szpiech

First published as a special issue of the journal Medieval Encounters (vol. 23, 2017), this volume, edited by Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett, Silke Ackermann, and Ryan Szpiech, brings together fifteen studies on various aspects of the astrolabe in medieval cultures. The astrolabe, developed in antiquity and elaborated throughout the Middle Ages, was used for calculation, teaching, and observation, and also served astrological and medical purposes. It was the most popular and prestigious of the mathematical instruments, and was found equally among practitioners of various sciences and arts as among princes in royal courts. By considering sources and instruments from Muslim, Christian, and Jewish contexts, this volume provides state-of-the-art research on the history and use of the astrolabe throughout the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Silke Ackermann, Emilia Calvo, John Davis, Laura Fernández Fernández, Miquel Forcada, Azucena Hernández, David A. King, Taro Mimura, Günther Oestmann, Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Sreeramula Rajeswara Sarma, Petra G. Schmidl, Giorgio Strano, Flora Vafea, and Johannes Thomann.
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Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett and Silke Ackermann

This Special Issue of Medieval Encounters is based on the papers of the conference on “Astrolabes in Medieval Cultures” held at the Warburg Institute, University of London, on 24–25 April 2014, under the aegis of a three-year research project on “Astrolabes in Jewish Culture.” This project was

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Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett and Silke Ackermann

This book, first published as a Special Issue of Medieval Encounters , is based on the papers of the conference on “Astrolabes in Medieval Cultures” held at the Warburg Institute, University of London, on 24–25 April 2014, under the aegis of a three-year research project on “Astrolabes in Jewish

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Azucena Hernández

the culture that produced such instruments. The astrolabe of Petrus Raimundi is a witness to the society of the second half of the fourteenth century in the kingdom of Aragon 1 under King Peter iv el Ceremonioso who was a supporter of science, mainly astronomy, astrology, medicine, and, above

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Silke Ackermann

essential knowledge for the construction of astrolabe clock dials. Four papers in this issue focus on the rich culture of scientific exchange and instrument production in medieval Spain. How little we know even about seemingly basic workshop practices and division of labour in the Middle Ages is lamented by

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Silke Ackermann

Nuremberg citizen know about astrolabes in the first half of the sixteenth century? Did women make, use, and teach the use of astrolabes in the Islamic World? This Special Issue of Medieval Encounters cannot answer all these questions, of course, but it intends to fill some of the blank areas—to tame at

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Thomas F. Glick

Book Reviews / Medieval Encounters 17 (2011) 579-591 587 David A. King, Astrolabes from Medieval Europe . Variorum Collected Studies Series CS977. Farnham, Surrey/Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 2011. 422 + xv pp. Illustrations; index. An astrolabe is an astronomical instrument that has a variety of

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Azucena Hernández

survived to the present day, despite their small size and the ease of reusing brass, the alloy of which they are made. The use of the astrolabe by astronomers cannot alone account for its proliferation in the Middle Ages; we must also consider the political, social, and technological aspects of the culture

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Sreeramula Rajeswara Sarma

Astrolabes in Medieval Cultures” at the Warburg Institute on 24‒25 April 2014. Finally, I am highly indebted to Nahla Nassar, Curator and Registrar, Nasser D. Khalili Collection of Islamic Art, who kindly facilitated my study of the Indian astronomical instruments in 2005 in London, and now overwhelmed me by

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Günther Oestmann

Latin Translation: A Critical Bibliography (Berkeley–Los Angeles, CA : University of California Press, 1956), 113–116. 35 Josefina Rodríguez Arribas, “Medieval Jews and Medieval Astrolabes: Where, Why, How, and What For?” in Time, Astronomy, and Calendars in the Jewish Tradition , ed. Sacha Stern and