Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 284 items for :

  • All: Education: Theory and Practice x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
Theory and Practice
There is no shortage of scholarly research that reflects the growing importance of open education, whether referring to issues surrounding access to education (formal, informal or postformal); different copyright licencing regimes (e.g. Creative Commons); alternative forms of educational delivery such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), or alternative pathways to learning, curriculum development and delivery and/or assessing and accrediting learning. So what can another publication add to our understanding of open education?

It has become clear that thinking in terms of the binaries of ‘open’ versus ‘closed’ can no longer account and do justice to the wide range of possibilities and the varying factors that destabilise some definitions and practices. In Open(ing) Education: Theory and Practice, the authors therefore map ‘open’ as emerging from a dynamic network or ecology of often mutually constitutive factors resulting in a range of possibilities. The chapters in this book provide us with glimpses of open, opening, and opened, with none of these being permanent states of affairs, but rather contingent, serendipitous, often uncertain, and fluid.

This book is unique not only with regard to its variety of approaches to mapping the various possibilities between open and closed but also with regard to the global spread of its many contributing authors.
Author: Anna Gatmon

education theory and practice, this framework offers simple skills that can help us tap into our spiritual capacities and develop our inner spiritual guide, providing an opportunity for a spiritually guided life in collaboration with what we call Spirit, or the hidden intelligence of the universe. This

In: Understanding New Perspectives of Spirituality
The Nature of Transformation: Environmental Adult Education is based on 15 years of educating for social-environmental change around the world. It is for adult and community educators, trainers, literacy and health care practitioners, social activists, community artists and animators, labour educators, and professors in higher education interested in weaving environmental issues in to their educational practice. It is also for environmental activists and educators who want to link social issues to environmental issues and problems. This book is a contribution to the discourse and practice of adult education in the community and/or the academy, aimed to respond creativity and critically the contemporary socio-environmental crisis and to encourage hope and a stronger sense of political agency through an ecological approach to teaching, and learning.
The Nature of Transformation includes a discussion of key adult education theories we used to augment our educational practice, provides a plethora of educational activities, shares workshop design considerations and some of the challenges we faced in our wok, as well as stories from adult and community educators around the world. The book concludes with a list of resources to enhance understandings of adult education theory and practice. The Nature of Transformation illustrates how to critically and creatively integrate the rest of nature, concepts of ecological and gender and justice, citizenship, critical environmental consciousness and activism into educating and learning in community settings, organisations, education institutions or workplaces. In particular, there is an emphasis on using the arts as a tool for learning and change.
With its emphasis on acknowledging and confronting ecological oppression, working towards socio-environmental justice, ensuring hope and fun are integral to the learning process, encouraging defiance, agency and creativity, challenging assumptions, and helping people to find solutions environmental adult education is a valuable player in any pedagogical quest for change and transformation.
Volume Editors: Linda Ware and Roger Slee
Ellen A. Brantlinger: When Meanings Falter and Words Fail, Ideology Matters celebrates the work of and is dedicated to the memory of Ellen A. Brantlinger, a scholar-activist who spent most of her professional career as a professor of special education at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana in the United States of America. Ellen was recognized internationally as an educator and critical theorist and celebrated for her incisive and unyielding critique of special education research, policy, and practice that spanned several decades. Brantlinger held that the impoverished nature of special education theory and practice was rooted to conformance with the most rigid constructs of standardization, normalcy, and its resulting inequitable outcomes for children with disabilities. When the push for educational inclusion gained currency in some quarters in the United States (mid-1980s), Brantlinger was among a handful of scholars who identified special education as the major obstacle to the inclusion of disabled students in the educational system. She was widely published in North American journals well known in special education, teacher education, multicultural education, sociology of education, urban education, school counseling, curriculum theory, qualitative education, and feminist teaching. This book offers an elaboration of the scholarly contributions made by Ellen Brantlinger to research in education, special education, inclusive education, and the early development of Disability Studies in Education. Many of its contributors move between the paradigmatic locations of special education, inclusive education, and disability studies as they consider Ellen’s influence.

Contributors are: Julie Allan, Subini A. Annamma, Jessica Bacon, Alicia A. Broderick, Kathleen M. Collins, David J. Connor, Dianne L. Ferguson, Philip M. Ferguson, Amy L. Ferrel, Beth Ferri, Joanne Kim, Janette Klingner, Corrine Li, Brooke A. Moore, Emily A. Nusbaum, and Janet S. Sauer.
Views from India, South Africa, and Canada
Shades of Globalization casts an ethnographic eye on the interplay between local and global influences on the organization and activities within three early childhood settings, each of which is located in a context of rapid social change. Stemming from a four-year study of early childhood thought and practice, each of the eight chapters touches on a different aspect of the three case study preschools, one each in India, South Africa, and an aboriginal community in Canada. The authors take a critical perspective on taken-for-granted assumptions about what constitutes the most appropriate preschool experience for children, querying for example, the meaning of school readiness within local communities.
This book will appeal to those who have an interest in the diversity of children’s lives and preschool experiences throughout the world - education and social policy makers, teacher educators, teachers, pre-service student teachers, day-care workers, parents, community leaders, governmental and non-governmental organizations and consultants, early childhood program planners and evaluators, community development workers, university lecturers, and developmental psychologists.
Ailie Cleghorn is Professor of Education at Concordia University in Montreal. She teaches in the Educational Studies Masters Program and conducts research that is grounded in her field of comparative sociology of education. Earlier publications include Issues in African Education: Sociological Perspectives, with Ali A. Abdi (Palgrave-MacMillan) and Missing the Meaning: The Development and Use of Print and Non-Print Text Materials in Diverse School Settings, with Alan Peacock (Palgrave-MacMillan).
Larry Prochner is Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Alberta. His research centres on the historical and comparative study of education. Recent publications include The History of Early Childhood Education in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand (University of British Columbia Press), and Early Childhood Care and Education: Theory and Practice, with Prerana Mohite (Concept Publishers).
The Afterword is written by Professor Jessica Ball, School of Child and Youth Care, University of Victoria, British Columbia. Professor Ball is the Principal Investigator on projects in the Early Childhood Development Intercultural Partnerships program at the University of Victoria. She is also Coordinator of First Nations Partnership Programs - a two-year diploma program in early childhood education and youth care, delivered through partnerships with Indigenous communities and post-secondary institutions in western Canada. She has worked extensively to protect cultural diversity and support development of community-based services to promote optimal child health and development.
Author: Peter Roberts

, CO, and London, UK, Paradigm Publishers, 2010), Neoliberalism, Higher Education and Research (with Michael Peters, Rotterdam, Sense Publishers, 2008), Digital Developments in Higher Education: Theory and Practice (edited with Mark Chambers, Cambridge, UK, Taylor Graham Publishing, 2001), and

In: From West to East and Back Again

: Theories and Practices in a Changing Context 1 Katherine Jelly and Alan Mandell Section I: Underlying Principles, Ideas and Values: Perennial Questions 1. Empire State College and the Conflicted Legacy of Progressive Higher Education 29 Wayne Carr Willis 2. Conflict, Change, and Continuity: ESC

In: Principles, Practices, and Creative Tensions in Progressive Higher Education
A Practical Guide to Doctoral Study Online and Beyond
Author: Dianne Conrad
Our technologically advanced society has generated many rapid changes in higher education in recent years. These changes have been recently exacerbated by the global pandemic COVID-19. Educational institutions around the world have adapted to offering their programs by distance, usually via online computer platforms. While many levels of credentials already existed successfully online, the elite and difficult doctoral degree has remained largely traditional, a bricks-and-mortar program, requiring attendance and perhaps a major lifestyle transition for learners. COVID has changed and will continue to change that.

This book explores the world of online learning and online doctoral study post-COVID and in the future. From “should I undertake this learning?” to how to choose a supervisor and manage the online research experience, using her years of experience and insight, the author has compiled a practical guide outlining not only how to successfully undertake online doctoral study but also how to wisely transfer that acquired online acumen beyond graduation, into the academic life. Newly-minted PhDs and EdDocs face a steep learning curve when entering the professorial life in the Ivory Tower of higher education. This down-to-earth, plain language, and often humorous text explores the pedagogical advantages of the online experience and their usefulness to the new academic hire. Current doctoral learners, both traditional and online, as those mulling future educational plans, and doctoral completers surveying higher education opportunities will benefit from the insight and advice in this very frank text.
Joseph Beuys significantly influenced the development of art in recent decades through his expanded definition of art. In his art and reflections on art, he raised far-reaching questions on the nature of art and its central importance for modern education. His famous claim, “Every human is an artist,“ points to the fundamental ability of every human to be creative in the art of life – with respect to the development of one’s own personality and one’s actions within society. Beuys saw society as an artwork in a permanent process of transformation, a ‘social sculpture‘ in which every person participated, and for which everyone should be educated as comprehensively as possible.

Beuys describes pedagogy as central to his art. This book thus examines important aspects of Beuys’s art and theory and the challenges they raise for contemporary artistic education. It outlines the foundational theoretical qualities of artistic education and discusses the practice of ‘artistic projects’ in a series of empirical examples. The author, Carl-Peter Buschkühle, documents projects he has undertaken with various high school classes. In additional chapters, Mario Urlaß discusses the great value of artistic projects in primary school, and Christian Wagner reflects on his collaboration with the performance artist Wolfgang Sautermeister and school students in a socially-disadvantaged urban area.

Artistic education has become one of the most influential art-pedagogical concepts in German-speaking countries. This book presents its foundations and educational practices in English for the first time.

thematic unit on friendship (Jennifer L. Nigh), the use of fiction to increase motivation and comprehension (Aseel Kanakri), sharing children’s literature (Mariana Romero), and using personal narrative writing (Steven L. Turner). These chapters offer a unique approach to literacy education. Theory and

In: Pump It Up