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Author: Jacob Boas
In Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-40, Jacob Boas offers a broad selection of the newspaper columns of legendary Dutch cultural critic Menno ter Braak. Ter Braak’s columns are noteworthy not only for their distinctive treatment of disparate cultural components ranging from literature to the social sciences, but also for the light they throw on the extent to which politics intruded on the cultural sphere in the years prior to the outbreak of war.
Ter Braak set a standard for literary criticism of surpassing quality. Moreover, a staunch advocate of democracy, the critic joined the battle against fascism, urging fellow intellectuals to rise to the occasion. The ‘conscience of Dutch letters’ killed himself on the eve of the German occupation, May 1940.
Author: Jacob Boas

© koninklijke brill nv, leiden, ���6 | doi �0.��63/97890043��738_0�3 <UN> chapter 11 Networking Exile: Going Dutch Émigré Writers in the Netherlands, 1933–1940, and One Dutchman’s Assessment (Menno Ter Braak)1 Jacob Boas Abstract Upon Hitler’s accession to power, a small number of German authors

In: Networks of Refugees from Nazi Germany

24, 1935, the second on June 25. Ter Braak himself spoke on June 22. For his speech, see Appendix 3 . Ter Braak’s Vaderland reports reprinted, in slightly modified form, from Jacob Boas, Writers’ Block, The Paris Antifascist Congress of 1935 (Cambridge: Legenda, 2016), by permission of the

In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940

the bulk of émigré literature. Between 1934 and 1940, signing off as Leopold Fabrizius, Thelen reviewed 143 of their books. See Jacob Boas, “Albert Vigoleis Thelen and Émigré Literature: Dispatches from Mallorca and other European Venues, 1934–1940,” in Spanienbilder aus dem deutschsprachigen Exil

In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940
In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940
In: Cultural Criticism in the Netherlands, 1933-1940