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Experiences from the U.S.A., India, and China
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Toward Community-Based Learning contends that the ideal school offers the opportunity to understand reality in a way that connects teaching and education with conditions in the surrounding community and the student’s life and concerns. This view holds that problem solving requires an understanding and awareness of the whole, which can be achieved through direct activities. In this manner, learning is linked to its natural context, with ideal instruction being actively problem-oriented, holistic, and life-centered.

This thought-provoking volume offers an essential and comprehensive picture of community-based learning in the field of education. The book deals with the history of community-based learning as well as its present applications, including its global successes and difficulties. The authors provide numerous pedagogical approaches that are designed to meet the challenges of contemporary education. They show how learning is connected with authentic community environments in which students can gain new understandings through solving emerging problems. They also demonstrate how teachers can make learning more functional and holistic so that students have the ability to work in new situations within the complex world around them. School-specific descriptions reveal how teachers and their students have implemented community-based projects in the U.S.A., India, and China at different times.

Contributors are: Thomas L. Alsbury, Mary Ewans, Linda Hargreaves, Susan K. Johnsen, Eija Kimonen, Susan Kobashigawa, Karon N. LeCompte, Suzanne M. Nesmith, Raimo Nevalainen, and Lakia M. Scott.
The Essence of Outdoor-Oriented Education in the USA and India
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What was the interrelationship between education and society during the twentieth century in the United States and India? What is the essence of the historical development of educational policies and social systems in these two countries? What philosophical views and developmental courses underlie their outdoor-oriented education? What are their aims of outdoor-oriented education? What procedures are connected with their outdoor-oriented education? These questions are examined in this unique volume.

This book is divided into three parts. The first part creates a context for the comparison of the issues concerning education and society. The second part analyzes the social systems and educational policies of the United States and India following their developmental trends and patterns. The third part is an analysis and comparison of the phenomena previously presented that are related to education and society through the lenses suggested by sociological theories. It compares the dimensions of the interrelationship between education and society from the standpoint of outdoor-oriented education in the two countries during the twentieth century.

This thought-provoking volume is intended for anybody interested in the interplay between education and society in all its complexity. It offers a fascinating journey into the past and present of the issues that have defined the development of education and society in the United States and India.
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303 E. Kimonen & R. Nevalainen (Eds.). Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally: In Search of a Better Way for Schools and Their Communities, 303–338. © 2013 Sense Publishers. All Rights Reserved. EIJA KIMONEN 11. TEACHERS’ WORK AND CHANGING SOCIALIZATION ENVIRONMENTS Pedagogical Procedures of Outdoor

In: Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally
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199 PART THREE REFORMING TEACHERS’ WORK IN A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE 200 201 EIJA KIMONEN 8. PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVES FOR TEACHERS’ WORK Focusing on American and Indian Outdoor-Oriented Education with International Connections INTRODUCTION This chapter will address some basic philosophical

In: Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally
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55 EIJA KIMONEN 3. CHANGING AIMS AND VALUES OF OUTDOOR-ORIENTED EDUCATION Ideals for Teachers’ Work from the American and Indian Experience INTRODUCTION What were the aims and associated values of outdoor-oriented education in two socially different countries, the United States and India, during

In: Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally
In Search of a Better Way for Schools and Their Communities
Volume Editors: and
This volume is a collection of studies examining the key role of the teacher in the process of school change when innovative pedagogical practices and better ways to develop the school are being sought. Teachers’ work in a changing school culture is a central source of strength in establishing the new practices in ordinary school life. Teachers are generally understood to be crucial for successful change in the school, for the long-term development of their professionalism, and for the advancement of the school’s socio-cultural processes.
The aim of this book is to outline the complex character of teachers’ work in schools and their communities. Teachers’ work is observed here in the light of research presenting innovative approaches and reforms. This book is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on contexts for transformation in teachers’ work, the second on an examination of case studies documenting the changing nature of teachers’ work, and the third on comparison of the trends and issues previously presented. The chapters in this volume discuss prospects of teachers’ work in the United States and Europe, as well as in China, India, and Japan.
Cover photographs by Raimo Nevalainen

Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally In Search of a Better Way for Schools and Their Communities Edited by Eija Kimonen University of Eastern Finland, Finland and Raimo Nevalainen University of Jyväskylä, Finland SENSE PUBLISHERS ROTTERDAM / BOSTON / TAIPEI A C

In: Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally
Bright Prospects for Active Schools
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What are the prerequisites for reforming education, and how can these reforms be seen in school development and culture? How should teacher education support this reform process? What are the principles and practices underlying the functioning of the schools of tomorrow? These questions are examined in this unique volume.
The authors in this book argue that the central function of teacher education and education in general is to respond to the challenges brought on by the twenty-first century. According to this approach, the competencies and skills needed in the future are not merely a new addition to school activities, but rather something requiring a comprehensive reform of school culture encompassing teacher education, curricula, and teaching methods. Such a fundamental process of change in the action and thinking models used by schools would be an effort to achieve a complete transformation, the result of which would be schools developing into organizations that are both creative and imbued with a strong sense of community. A central attribute is that the creation of new knowledge is not just restricted to the classroom but also takes place in out-of-school environments. This would link learning to its natural context, eventually leading to an ideal instruction that is actively problem oriented, holistic, and life centered.
This reform-minded volume is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on the reform processes in teacher education, the second on the reforms of pedagogics at schools and teacher education institutions, and the third on the processes of reculturing schools. New prospects for active schools in the United States and Europe, as well as in Japan and China, are discussed.
Ideas and Practices from the U.S.A., India, Russia, and China
This book examines the interplay between education and society in the 20th and early 21st centuries and addresses philosophical views and educational aims with their associated values for community-based learning in the U.S.A., India, Russia, and China. The philosophical background of community-based learning in these countries relies both on national philosophical traditions and on reformist ideas in international schools of thought—over time opposition to certain international pedagogical ideas surfaced in these countries.

The authors offer a comprehensive picture of community-based learning in education and demonstrate how teachers can make learning more functional and holistic so that students can work in new situations within their complex worlds. School-specific descriptions reveal how teachers and students implemented community-based projects at different times.

Education and Community Service University of Havaii Hoi, HI U.S.A. Eija Kimonen, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Education, Intercultural and Comparative Education Senior Researcher, Education School of Applied Educational Science and Teacher Education Philosophical Faculty University of Eastern Finland

In: Transforming Teachers’ Work Globally