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[German version] Furtum is the offence against property in Roman law. At least in the classical period (1st-3rd cents. AD) the term furtum includes not only theft and embezzlement, but also the mere use of items that are not one's own (furti usus), the removal of one's own property, e.g. from a

In: Brill's New Pauly Online
Author: A.J.B. Sirks

Introduction
 Current views on furtum are either that it was the act of touching another’s property against his wish, or that it was the taking away (asportation) of another’s property, against his wish 1 . In both views the contents of furtum underwent in the period between the Twelve Tables

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review
Author: J.A.C. Thomas

FURTUM PIGNORIS by J. A. C. THOMAS (London) *) Though pledge figures quite prominently in the law of furtum, there is nowhere - so far as I am aware - a study devoted to furtum pignoris as such. It is, therefore, the aim of the present paper to bring together some of the interesting issues

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review
Author: G. Maccormack

271 OPE CONSILIO FURTUM FACTUM by G. MACCORMACK (Aberdeen) The issues to be discussed are: when did the law begin to distinguish between theft as such and complicity in theft, what criteria did it establish for liability as an accomplice and to what extent can the formula in the two cases be

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review
Author: J.A.C. Thomas

REI HEREDITARIAE FURTUM NON FIT* by J. A. C. THOMAS (London) In his valuable researches on furtum 1), Albanese observes that the question of furtum of res hereditariae is one deserving separate treatment 2) and intimates 3) his intention of dealing at some future time with the topic. However

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review
Author: David Daube

SOME COMPARATIVE LAW - FURTUM CONCEPTUM. BY DAVID DAUBE (Caius College, Cambridge). It is generally assumed that the ve8tigii minatio, the pursuit of a thief and the search in his house under certain formalities 1), is a practice peculiar to the Indo-Germanic race. La chase au voleur corre8pond

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review
Author: A. Watson

THE DEFINITION OF FURTUM AND THE TRICHOTOMY by A. WATSON (Oxford) The following definition of theft is found in D.47.2.1.3. (Paul 39 ad ed.) Furtum est contrectatio rei fraudulosa lucri faciendi gratia vel ipsius rei vel etiam usus eius possessionisve, quod lege naturali prohibitum est

In: Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review