initial body of audio-visual material of Mehri and Śḥerɛ̄t speakers in the field. Our observation of face-to-face communication shows that gesture is almost invariably present, that it collaborates with the aural component to deliver meaning, and that it shows language- and environment

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
In: To the Madbar and Back Again

Jibbāli and Mehri Lexicons, and was a great inspiration. I was then invited by the Oman Government to return to Dhofar at intervals to continue fieldwork. As well as recording Baṭḥari and Hobyōt, the least known languages at that time, I also did a lot of work on Śḥerɛ̄t and some on Mehri (mainly in the

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics

Śḥerɛ̄t s̃ ~ š Contrast. In To the Madbar and Back Again: Studies in the Languages, Archaeology, and Cultures of Arabia Dedicated to Michael C.A. Macdonald , ed. Laïla Nehmé and Ahmad al-Jallad, pp. 622–644. Leiden: Brill. Bulakh, Maria. 2017. Review of Aaron D. Rubin, The Jibbali (Shaḥri) Language of

In: Omani Mehri

neutral valad; in Yiddish, the word sherets is used (35). And finally, where a Hassid believes that he is talking to a demon and is afraid that the demon will double-cross him, he writes, essentially, that the demon will simply give him obscenities in return (meile, ikh vil dir a toyve tohn un dernoch

In: Zutot

[early morning], ḳhēb [around midday], watxaf [afternoon to sunset], ṭwuh [night]. Today, watxaf remains in common usage, but otherwise nūka ( nūkaʕ in Mahriyōt, zḥam or nukaʕ in Śḥerɛ̄t) is used to indicate coming at any time of day together with a time adverbial” ( ibidem ). Perché

In: Annali Sezione Orientale

, the MSA languages are Jibbali (also called Shaḥri, Śḥeri, or Śḥerɛ̄t), Ḥarsusi, Soqoṭri, Hobyot, and Baṭḥari. 1 Mehri, Jibbali, and Soqoṭri each have a number of dialects. The established term ‘Modern South Arabian’ can be misleading, since these languages are not the descendants of the set of

In: Omani Mehri