wasp family Serphitidae (Proctotrupomorpha: Bipetiolarida: Serphitoidea), occurring in Cretaceous (Turonian) amber from New Jersey, are reviewed. Two species, both new, are described and fi gured as Serphites raritanensis Engel & Grimaldi sp.n. and S . navesinkae Engel & Grimaldi sp.n. Keywords Apocrita

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

radiomedial crossvein. Systematic Palaeontology Order Hymenoptera Linnaeus, 1758 Suborder Apocrita Gerstaecker, 1867 Family Ephialtitidae Rasnitsyn & Zhang, 2010 Genus Symphytopterus Rasnitsyn, 1975 Type species Symphytopterus nigricornis Rasnitsyn, 1975 Species included Type species

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Editor: Medvedev
Part VI of Keys to the Insects of the European Part of the USSR covers the suborder Symphyta of the phytophagous Hymenoptera (sawflies and woodwasps), small superfamilies Trigonaloidea, Stephanoidea, Evanioidea of parasitic Apocrita, and the family Paxilommatidae of the superfamily Ichneumonoidea. Identification keys are provided for 18 families, 123 genera and over 900 species which include a large number of economically important species — the pests of agricultural crops and timber as well as entomophages. A brief outline of morphology and biology, synonymy and geographic distribution is given for each family and genus and the known host-plants are indicated for every species. Three species have been described for the first time and 12 new subgenera have been separated.
Bibliography — 88 citations; 217 illustrations.

Orussoidea comprising extant Orussidae and ex- tinct Paroryssidae are currently considered to be the sister group of Apocrita; together, they com- prise the Vespina (Rasnitsyn 1988, Rasnitsyn & Quicke 2002; Vilhelmsen 2001, 2004; Ronquist et al. 1999: fig. 9; Schulmeister 2003). In other words, these authors

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

Symphyta and Ephialtit- idae (Rasnitsyn 1969, 1975), the basalmost Apo- crita, but not observed in any known Evanioidea and most Apocrita (except for the most basal extinct taxa and for rudiments in few extant Ichneumonoidea); (2) 11 closed cells in the fore- wing, which, relative to 10 in Praeaulacinae

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Author: Ole Lomholdt

mentioned subfamilies may be in- terpreted as a synapomorphic trait. Richards & Davis (1977) brought attention to the fact that only two thoracic ganglia are present in the bees and the Crabroninae (included in the Larrinae sensu Evans 1964). In other Apocrita the meso- and metathoracic ganglia are

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

morphology in the Hymen- 134 Rasnitsyn, A. P. et al. INSECT SYST. EVOL. 35.2 (2004) optera: Apocrita – evolutionary transitions among par- asitic wasps. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 74: 87–111. Dowton M., Austin, A.D., Dillon, N., & Bartowsky, E. 1997. Molecular phylogeny of the apocritan

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

an extraordinarily diverse and notorious rapid radiation of Apocrita ( Whitfield & Kjer 2008 ). Most apocritan superfamilies are robustly monophyletic, but the relationships between them are weakly resolved. Perhaps the most uncertain is the position of the small hyperparasitoid lineage

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In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

, 1934 (Nothomyrmeciinae) and Aneuretus Emery, 1893 (Aneuretinae), have vein 2+3Rs curved and not angular, with no clear signs of the former separa- tion of cells 1r and 2r. In Apocrita other than ants, a complete or nearly complete 1r-rs is an uncom- mon feature, but it is not rare in the more ple

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution

) Hymenoptera Apocrita of Meso- zoic. Trudy paleont. Inst. 147: 1-134. [In Russian.] Rasnitsyn, A. P. (1980) Proiskhozhdenie i evolyutsiya pereponchatokrylykh nasekomykh (Origin and Evolution of Hymenoptera). Trudy paleont. Inst. 174: 192 pp. [In Russian.] Rasnitsyn, A. P. (1986) Vespida (= Hymenoptera). In

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution