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The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions
Author: John Marenbon
Medieval logic is usually divided into the branches that derived from Aristotle's organon - the 'logica vetus' and 'logica nova', and those invented in the Middle Ages, the 'logica modernorum'. In this volume, a group of distinguished specialists asks whether the ancient roots of medieval logic were not in fact more varied. Stoic logic was mostly lost, but were some of its themes transmitted, even in distorted form, through Boethius and through the grammatical tradition? And did other schools, such as the sceptics and the Platonists, contribute in their own ways to medieval logic?
Author: Luc Deitz

Abstract

Francesco Patrizi da Cherso's Discussiones peripateticae (1581) are one of the most comprehensive analyses of the whole of Aristotelian philosophy to be published before Werner Jaeger's Aristoteles. The main thrust of the argument in the Discussiones is that whatever Aristotle had said that was true was not new, and that whatever he had said that was new was not true. The article shows how Patrizi proves this with respect to the Organon, and deals with the implications for the history af ancient philosophy in general implied by his stance.

In: Vivarium

anticipation of nature but not to its investigation. This faulty methodology is based on Aristotle's Organon, which Bacon proposed to replace with his Novum Organum. Bacon's own concrete research directives hardly met with success. But his identification of the intellectual obstructions that impede the

In: Religion Past and Present Online

of poetry and rhetoric. Dialectic instruction survived, but the dialectic now being taught was the new version developed by Agricola and his disciples. Lectures in dialectic were no longer based on Aristotle's Organon but on one of the many introductory texts and compendia produced by human- ist

In: Nederlands Archief voor Kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History

, index, par—(Paris 1997) 2 tomes H. Lausberg, Handbuch der literarischen Rhetorik (München 1973) J. Lyons, Linguistic semantics (Cambridge 1995) J. Martin, Antike Rhetorik (München 1974) H. Tredennick & E.S. Forster, Aristotle , Organon, Posterior Analytics, Topica , ed. with an Engl. transl. by

In: Mnemosyne
Author: Jaakko Hintikka

Professor Smith opposes the view that Aristotle's Organon is a Methodenlehre, which is calculated to show how scientists and philosophers should proceed in their inquiries. In the place of such a view, he puts the idea that the Organon aims at the char- acterization of epistemological virtue

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy
Author: Robin Smith

closely related subjects, including fallacious arguments and demonstrative sci- ence. Tradition regarded them as giving Aristotle's account of scientific philosophical method: the "instrument" necessary for the attainment of knowledge. It was as such that Francis Bacon rejected Aristotle's Organon and

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy

tomes (Paris 1997). Lausberg, H., Handbuch der literarischen Rhetorik (München 1973). Lyons, J., Linguistic Semantics (Cambridge 1995). Martin, J., Antike Rhetorik (München 1974). Tredennick, H., Forster, E.S. (eds), Aristotle: Organon , Posterior Analytics, Topica (Cambridge, MA/London 1960).

In: Form and Function in Greek Grammar
Author: Rijksbaron

. Lyons, Linguistic semantics (Cambridge 1995) J. Martin, Antike Rhetorik (München 1974) H. Tredennick & E.S. Forster, Aristotle , Organon, Posterior Analytics, Topica , ed. with an Engl. transl. by—(Cambridge MA/London 1960; Loeb ed.) MANILIANA MANILIUS 1.217 1 ) nusquam invenies fulgere Canopon donec ad

In: Mnemosyne
Author: William Wians

explains this ontologically rather than lin- guistically, and so falls short of a modern understanding of the problem. In the year's final colloquium, Robin Smith asks "What Use is Aristotle's Organon?" He points out that the question has been answered many times and in many ways over the centuries, but

In: Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy