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Art, in all its manifestations, should above all be national. It is necessary to accustom the eyes of the Russian people to seeing beauty everywhere—at railway stations, in churches, and on the streets. 1 Savva Mamontov ∵ The activity of the Abramtsevo artistic circle is so multifaceted and so

In: Experiment

1890 in the community of artists who gathered around Mamontov, who, during this period, would become an influential industrialist and patron. Later this group would come to be known as the Abramtsevo artistic circle. It was comprised of artists from different generations—the sculptor Mark Antokolskii

In: Experiment

Abstract

The strong national voice at Abramtsevo, based on a sense of harmony among native landscapes, religious and folk life, and estate culture was intrinsic to Slavic revival movements of the late nineteenth century. The estate and its surroundings were settings for Russian-themed paintings and inspired artists to seek and express a Russian “spirit of nature.” The search for a national landscape was connected with literary and intellectual culture fostered at Abramtsevo and neighboring estates, and with the presence of religious centers in the area. Local topography and collaboration among the Abramtsevo artists in the 1880s led to new ideas about a national landscape as artists ranged further afield in the next decade. Landscapes of mood and decorative works based on natural forms shifted the role of landscape from concrete subject to a source for formal experimentation.

In: Experiment

), Orientalism had persisted throughout the “long” nineteenth century as a subgenre in the Russian visual and decorative arts, although it was not as pervasive and prolific as in the British and French contexts. 6 Unique to the Abramtsevo artistic circle, however, was the way in which Eastern themes and motifs

In: Experiment

Elena Voronina, director of the Federal State Cultural Establishment Artistic and Literary Museum-Reserve Abramtsevo, for her accompanying words, and the opportunity to include an extract from the unpublished chronicle of the Abramtsevo artistic circle. The generous and collegial support of the museum

In: Experiment

unprecedented diversity and scale of its activities, and the exceptional influence that it exerted on the course of national art. Virtually every art museum in Russia—as well as many abroad—contains artworks related to the activities of the Abramtsevo artistic circle. There are significant collections in the

In: Experiment

Ostroukhov, and finally the signatures of Aleksandr Krivoshein, Petr Iakub, and Vsevolod Mamontov, as well as a number of other unknown persons. The Chronicle recounts the activities of the Abramtsevo artistic circle, rich in diverse artistic events, and reflects the unique personality of Savva Mamontov

In: Experiment

three selected translations, we seek to convey a sense of the place that Abramtsevo was, and is now. Day-to-day estate life and pithy reports of family affairs were recorded by the Mamontovs and the group of artists who collectively became known as “the Abramtsevo artistic circle” in a handwritten

In: Experiment

paper, 53.5 × 35 cm, State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow. Photo © Bridgeman Images 63 6 Mikhail Vrubel, Indian Tale , undated, watercolor on paper, 24.7 × 10.5 cm, Vladimir Dal Russian State Literary Museum, Moscow. Photo © Vladimir Dal Russian State Literary Museum 66 The Abramtsevo Artistic Circle and

In: Experiment

Abramtsevo is known as the earliest site of the Arts and Crafts movement in Russia, sharing aspects of its organization with similar English circles. 1 However, it would be incorrect to conclude that French critics were aware of Savva Mamontov and the Abramtsevo artistic circle as soon as their

In: Experiment