Author: Sophie Mills

the questioning of current orthodoxies, and they could hardly be said to represent mainstream Athenian opinion. While Athens’ intellectual atmosphere certainly did allow more criticism of the city than was possible in Sparta, the democracy itself may not always have been entirely tolerant. 10 While

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: Ryan K. Balot

interpretations, I then treat, successively, Leo Strauss’s ‘Socratic rationalism’, Bernard Williams’s uses of Greek tragedy, and Josiah Ober’s reconstruction of democratic Athens. I have chosen the latter three figures, in particular, because of their deep and wide-ranging influence on the study of Greek

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
Author: P.J. Rhodes

Once upon a time Thucydides’ view of the Athenian demos and its leaders tended to be accepted uncritically: Pericles was great not only because he had good policies for Athens but also because, while being an impeccable democrat, he led the demos rather than let the demos lead him; but

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought

Democratic Athens seems to have been the first place in the Greek world where there developed systematically a positive theorising of kingship. Initially this might seem surprising, since the Athenians had a strong tradition of rejecting one-man-rule, and from at least the early fifth century the

In: Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought
This volume offers a range of innovative approaches to Solon of Athens, legendary law-giver, statesman, and poet of the early sixth century B.C. In the first part, Solon’s poetry is reconsidered against the background of oral poetics and other early Greek poetry. The connection between Solon’s alleged roles as poet and as politician is fundamentally questioned. Part two offers a reassessment of Solon’s laws based on a revision of the textual tradition and recent views on early Greek lawgiving. In part three, fresh scrutiny of the archeological and written evidence of archaic Greece results in new perspectives on the agricultural crisis and Solon’s role in the social and political developments of sixth-century Athens.

Originally published in hardcover