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around resources from dominant individuals (Kapsalis & Berman, 1996a; Ventura et al., 2006 ; Tiddi et al., 2013 ). In contrast to the limitations of viewing exchange within a simple, dyadic framework, biological markets theory (BMT: Noë & Hammerstein, 1994, 1995) offered a more dynamic, flexible

In: Behaviour

: cooperative breeding, between-group dispersal, social network, territory quality, biological markets, Cichlidae, Neolamprologus pulcher/brichardi . 1) Corresponding authour: Ralph Bergmüller; present address: Department of Eco-Ethologie, Zoological Institute, University of Neuchâtel, Rue Emile-Argand 11, Case

In: Behaviour

responses separately, and then discuss the degree to which various indirect forms of cooperation based on the assessment of reputation may be motivated by inequity aversion. Another important issue to consider is the degree to which partner selection within a biological market selects for the ability to

In: Behaviour

) Summary Biological market models explain variability in reciprocity and interchange between groups. In groups with a shallow dominance gradient, grooming will be mostly exchanged for itself (i.e. exchange will occur). In groups with steep dominance hierarchies, interchange is ex- pected: individuals will

In: Behaviour

intensity of both BGC and WGC and used the Biological Markets model to examine their ef- fects on female dominance and grooming distributionsfor a group of samango monkeys ( Cer- copithecus mitis erythrarchus ) in a high-density, territorial population. We found high levels of territorial activity

In: Behaviour

cultivate those partnerships that best contribute to maximise their Ž tness. According to the biological markets theory, an individual’s attractiveness as a social partner depends on the value of the services that it can provide and trade for, which depends on the levels of supply and demand, that is, a

In: Behaviour
Authors: Joan Silk and Rebecca Frank

contingent reciprocity has led to a growing interest in how market forces shape the distribution of exchanges in animal groups. In a biological market, supply and demand determines the value of an exchange, and individuals choose to trade with the partner offering the highest value. Partners maximize their

In: Behaviour
Authors: Rebecca Frank and Joan Silk

Grooming exchange between mothers and non-mothers: the price of natal attraction in wild baboons ( Papio anubis ) Rebecca E. Frank 1) & Joan B. Silk (Department of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA) (Accepted: 4 November 2008) Summary In a biological market

In: Behaviour

). This is seen most strikingly in another very in uential model of female grooming relationships put forward by Seyfarth (1977). This model is an early prototype of a Biological Markets model (Noë et al. , 1991; Noë & Hammerstein, 1994); a fact we wish to emphasise since, in discussion 272 BARRETT

In: Behaviour

-building. Such an effect of mating success on behaviour might in particular be expected for behavioural traits which can be modified and adjusted to current circumstances in a biological market system. Metz et al. (2007b) have demonstrated that the construction of energetically costly extended phenotypes such as

In: Behaviour