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Division of labour within cooperatively breeding groups Kathryn E. Arnold 1,2) , Ian P.F. Owens 3) & Anne W. Goldizen 4) ( 1 Division of Environmental and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biomedical and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK; 3 Department of Biological

In: Behaviour

Large group size yields group stability in the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher Dik Heg 1,2) , Lyanne Brouwer 1,3) , Zina Bachar 1) & Michael Taborsky 1) ( 1 Department of Behavioural Ecology, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, CH-3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland; 3

In: Behaviour

INDIVIDUAL RECOGNITION IN A COOPERATIVELY BREEDING CICHLID: EVIDENCE FROM VIDEO PLAYBACK EXPERIMENTS by SIGAL BALSHINE-EARN 1 ) and ARNON LOTEM 2 ) (Department of Zoology, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv, 69978, Israel) (Acc. 22-XII-1997) Summary Most theories of social behaviour and

In: Behaviour

Size differences within a dominance hierarchy influence conflict and help in a cooperatively breeding cichlid Ian M. Hamilton 1) , Dik Heg & Nicole Bender (Institute of Zoology, University of Bern, Wohlenstrasse 50a, CH-3032 Hinterkappelen, Switzerland) (Accepted: 25 July 2005) Summary In size

In: Behaviour
Authors: S.P Sharp and B.J. Hatchwell

Individuality in the contact calls of cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits ( Aegithalos caudatus ) S.P. Sharp 1) & B.J. Hatchwell (Evolution and Behaviour Group, Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK) (Accepted: 25 July 2005) Summary The ability to discriminate

In: Behaviour

Extended safe havens and between-group dispersal of helpers in a cooperatively breeding cichlid Ralph Bergmüller 1) , Dik Heg , Katharina Peer & Michael Taborsky (Department of Behavioural Ecology, Zoological Institute, University of Bern, CH 3032 Hinterkapellen, Switzerland) (Accepted: 25 July

In: Behaviour

Age and relatedness have an interactive effect on the feeding behaviour of helpers in cooperatively breeding sociable weavers Claire Doutrelant 1,2,6) , Ambroise Dalecky 3) & Rita Covas 1,2,4,5) ( 1 CEFE-CNRS, Montpellier, France; 2 Percy FitzPatrick Institute, DST/NRF Centre of

In: Behaviour

group members of a cooperatively breeding cichlid fish respond to simulated visitors, and whether a group member’s social status influenced their response to these visitors. There are multiple ways in which visitors could inflict costs and these costs are likely to differ across individual group members

In: Behaviour

described as despotic, with weak tolerance levels among group members and well-differentiated relationships organised in a strong linear hierarchy (Archie et al., 2006 ; Bergstrom & Fedigan, 2013 ). This type of hierarchy has been described in cooperatively breeding invertebrate societies (Cronin & Field

In: Behaviour

, 2011 ). Given that fish are by far the most species-rich group of vertebrates and there are so few studies looking at the role of IT in regulating social behaviour, more studies in a greater diversity of fish species are warranted. Neolamprologus pulcher is a cooperatively breeding cichlid fish

In: Behaviour