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Interspecific cross-fostering of great tits ( Parus major ) by blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus ) affects inter- and intraspecific communication Bo Terning Hansen 1) , Lars Erik Johannessen & Tore Slagsvold (University of Oslo, Department of Biology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary

In: Behaviour

Interspecific cross-fostering affects mate guarding behaviour in great tits ( Parus major ) Bo Terning Hansen 1) , Lars Erik Johannessen & Tore Slagsvold (University of Oslo, Department of Biology, Centre for Ecological and Evolutionary Synthesis (CEES), P.O. Box 1066, N-0316 Oslo, Norway

In: Behaviour
Author: N.S. Clayton

THE EFFECTS OF CROSS-FOSTERING ON SELECTIVE SONG LEARNING IN ESTRILDID FINCHES by N. S. CLAYTON1)2) (Department of Biology and Preclinical Medicine, University of St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9TS, Scotland) (With 3 Figures) (Acc. 16-XI-1988) Introduction In the laboratory many species will copy the

In: Behaviour

THE EFFECTS OF CROSS-FOSTERING ON THE BEHAVIOR OF TWO SPECIES OF NORTH AMERICAN LEMMINGS, DICROSTONYX GROENLANDICUS AND LEMMUS TRIMUCRONATUS. III. AGONISTIC BEHAVIOR by U. WILLIAM HUCK1)2) and EDWIN M. BANKS 2) (Department of Ecology, Ethology and Evolution, University of Illinois, Urbana, III

In: Behaviour
Authors: Graeme Chapman and Ian Rowley

CROSS-FOSTERING, IMPRINTING AND LEARNING IN TWO SYMPATRIC SPECIES OF COCKATOO by IAN ROWLEY and GRAEME CHAPMAN1)2) (CSIRO Division of Wildlife and Rangelands Research, Helena Valley, Western Australia) (With 3 Figures) (Acc. 1-III-1985) Introduction The behaviour of a bird can be just as

In: Behaviour

'FOOD' CALLS PRODUCED BY ADULT FEMALE RHESUS (MACACA MULATTA) AND JAPANESE (M. FUSCATA) MACAQUES, THEIR NORMALLY-RAISED OFFSPRING, AND OFFSPRING CROSS-FOSTERED BETWEEN SPECIES by MICHAEL J. OWREN, JACQUELYN A. DIETER, ROBERT M. SEYFARTH, and DOROTHY L. CHENEY1) (Department of Psychology

In: Behaviour
Author: N.S. Clayton

SONG LEARNING IN CROSS-FOSTERED ZEBRA FINCHES: A RE-EXAMINATION OF THE SENSITIVE PHASE by N. S. CLAYTON1) (Department of Zoology and Marine Biology, The University, St. Andrews, Fife KY16 9TS, Scotland) (With 7 Figures) (Acc. 15-V III-1986) Introduction Some bird species are capable of learning

In: Behaviour
Author: Tore Slagsvold

CROSS-FOSTERING OF PIED FLYCATCHERS (FICEDULA HYPOLEUCA) TO HETEROSPECIFIC HOSTS IN THE WILD: A STUDY OF SEXUAL IMPRINTING by TORE SLAGSVOLD 1,2) (Department of Biology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1066, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway) (Acc. 6-IX-2004) Summary Learning from parents during early

In: Behaviour

OLFACTORY PREFERENCES OF INBRED MICE (MUS MUSCULUS) FOR THEIR OWN STRAIN AND FOR SIBLINGS: EFFECTS OF STRAIN, SEX AND CROSS-FOSTERING by BRUNO D'UDINE and LINDA PARTRIDGE1) (Istituto di Psicobiologia e Psicofarmacologia, C.N.R., Rome, Italy, Department of Zoology, University of Edinburgh, U

In: Behaviour
Authors: Senar and Quesada

Cross-fostering experiments to compare carotenoid- and melanin-based plumage traits and long-term parental effects in post-moulted great tits J. Quesada 1,2,3) & J.C. Senar 1) ( 1 Evolutionary and Behavioural Ecology Associated Research Unit (CSIC), Natural History Museum, P ◦ Picasso s

In: Behaviour