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Author: Mary McAleese
In the first study of its kind Mary McAleese subjects to comprehensive scrutiny the Roman Catholic Church’s 1983 Code of Canon law as it applies to children. The Catholic Church is the world’s largest non-governmental organisation involved in the provision of education and care services to children. It has over three hundred million child members world-wide the vast majority of whom became Church members when they were baptised as infants. Canon law sets out their rights and obligations as members. Children also have rights which are set out in the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to which the Holy See is State Party. The impact of the Convention on Canon Law is examined in detail and the analysis charts a distinct and worrying sea-change in the attitude of the Holy See to its obligations under the Convention since the clerical sex abuse scandals became a subject of discussion at the Committee on the Rights of the Child, which monitors implementation of the Convention.

Mary McAleese wins Europe’s richest theology prize for her study of canon law.
The former President of Ireland Mary McAleese has won one of the Catholic world’s most prestigious prizes, the Alfons Auer Ethics Award, from Tübingen University in Germany for her doctoral thesis on Children’s Rights and Obligations in Canon Law.
Editor: Christof Rolker
New Discourses in Medieval Canon Law Research offers a new narrative for medieval canon law history which avoids the pitfall of teleological explanations by taking seriously the multiplicity of legal development in the Middle Ages and the divergent interests of the actors involved. The contributors address the still dominant ‘master narrative’, mainly developed by Paul Fournier and enshrined in his magisterial Histoire de collections canoniques. They present new research on pre-Gratian canon collection, Gratian’s Decretum, decretal collections, but also hagiography, theology, and narrative sources challenging the standard account; a separate chapter is devoted to Fournier’s model and its genesis. New Discourses thus brings together specialized research and broader questions of who to write the history of church law in the Middle Ages.
Contributors are Greta Austin, Katheleen G. Cushing, Stephan Dusil, Tatsushi Genka, John S. Ott, Christof Rolker, Danica Summerlin, Andreas Thier and John C. Wei.
The Use of Canon Law in Ecclesiastical Administration, 1000–1234 explores the integration of canon law within administration and society in the central Middle Ages. Grounded in the careers of ecclesiastical administrators, each essay serves as a case study that couples law with social, political or intellectual developments. Together, the essays seek to integrate the textual analysis necessary to understand the evolution and transmission of the legal tradition into the broader study of twelfth century ecclesiastical government and practice. The essays therefore both place law into the wider developments of the long twelfth century but also highlight points of continuity throughout the period.

Contributors are Greta Austin, Bruce C. Brasington, Kathleen G. Cushing, Stephan Dusil, Louis I. Hamilton, Mia Münster-Swendsen, William L. North, John S. Ott, and Jason Taliadoros.
Author: Duve, Thomas

Canon law (from the Gr. kanṓn, Lat. canon, “rule, standard”) is the academic discipline of ecclesiastical law. So-called classical canon law began with Gratian's Decretum (ca. 1140). In the modern period on the the continent of Europe, the term was primarily applied to the discipline of Catholic

1. The term “canon law” refers to the study of church law (“canon” is a ruling by the church). It is a theological discipline using the methods of jurisprudence to ensure the orderly life of the church as an institution based on the will of Jesus Christ. It has the task of inquiring critically into

In: The Encyclopedia of Christianity Online

religious libraries (philosophy, theology, spirituality, liturgy, canon law, biblical literature and even classical authors), which after the secularization of the 18th–19th century were dispersed in most cases, preserved their majority in different libraries, sometimes geographically far away from each

In: Archiv für katholisches Kirchenrecht

[German Version] I. History – II. The Present – III. Orthodox Church – IV. The Study of Canon Law and Church Law – V. Practical Theology – VI. Oriental Orthodox Canon Law The church has had laws ever since Christians recognized the need for a generally recognized authority to regulate the

In: Religion Past and Present Online

Throughout the Kyivan, appanage and Muscovite periods, written Orthodox canon law generally prohibited marriage within the seventh degree of consanguinity as measured by the Roman system. 1 This rule prohibited marriage even between third cousins and was officially established by a church

In: Canadian-American Slavic Studies
Author: Pree, Helmuth

[German Version] From ancient canon law to CIC/1917, reconciliation (Lat. reconciliatio) denoted the (liturgical) absolution required for a church, cemetery, or altar to be used again after desecration or profanation (CIC/1917 cc. 1172–1177; 1207). It also denotes reconciliation with God and the

In: Religion Past and Present Online
Author: Klaus Mörsdorf

Part of Bishop: 1. New Testament 2. Church History 3. Theology 4. Canon Law 1. Meaning of episcopate. The episcopate is that ministry established in the Church of Jesus Christ which bestows a share in the Church’s office of teaching, sanctifying, and governing. Those called to it are successors of

In: Sacramentum Mundi Online