Search Results

Series:

Marta Moore

The Common Cultural Context This chapter investigates a body of art that can be defined as a Central European genre and is represented by such authors and directors as Danilo Kis, Milan Kundera, Czeslaw Milosz, Gyorgy Konrad, Istvan Szabo, Agnieszka Holland, Laszlo Nemes, and many others. The

Markian Prokopovych

Overseas Migration and Central European Migration History Vienna and Budapest, the two capitals of Austria-Hungary, were undergoing fundamental transformations in the course of the long nineteenth century: as capital cities, they were centres of industry and commerce as well as places where

Editors East Central Europe

The nature of labor movements and their political involvement and impact has recently been a matter of academic as well as political concern, at global level. In this respect, post-communist transformation in Eastern Europe offers an interesting case study. In the second half of 2007, the journal East Central Europe organized a debate on political scientist David Ost’s pioneering book The Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe. A study on socialist and postsocialist political culture, the book focuses on the evolution of Solidarność (Solidarity) in Poland over two decades, 1980–2000. While accounting for the Polish postsocialist path to what might be called “popular illiberalism,” Ost also tackles wider issues concerning processes of democratization in times of crisis. This debate includes five short polemical essays written by three graduate students (Kacper Pobłocki, Tibor T. Meszmann, and Gábor Halmai), one junior scholar (Eszter Bartha) and one senior scholar (Don Kalb). The authors are trained in different disciplines (anthropology, political science, and history) and are specializing in the history of different countries (Poland, Hungary, Serbia, and Slovenia), thus adding to the debate a variety of disciplinary and national perspectives. The reviewers acknowledge the paramount importance of Ost’s book, calling it “a mustread” for all scholars interested in East European politics and labor movements. They commend the author for bringing the concept of class back to postsocialist analyses, and for addressing a set of important interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological questions. At the same time, the reviewers question Ost’s eclectic methodology on various grounds, criticizing it mainly for a lack of “temporal tracking,” for placing too much “causal weight” on “elite discourses” in producing the turn to illiberalism at the expense of anthropological research at grass-roots level, and for assigning too little agency to non-elites and the “worker-citizens.” In his response, David Ost clarifies the theoretical framework and main arguments of his book and further elaborates on his position, both conceptually and empirically. He advances a normative argument for consolidating democracy in Eastern Europe, arguing that “political entrepreneurs must rethink, reimagine, recontextualize the concept of class, and must try to make conflicts over interests more appealing to the populace than conflicts over identities.”

Edited by Vasil Gluchman

Central European Value Studies is a pluralistic project that makes available to the English-speaking world books in all areas of value inquiry that originate in Central Europe or that deal with its major philosophical traditions.

Central European Value Studies is co-sponsored by:
• the Philosophy Seminar of the University of Mainz;
• the Centre for Cultural Research, Aarhus University; and
• the International Academy of Philosophy of the Principality of Liechtenstein

Editor-in-Chief Constantin Iordachi, Markian Prokopovych, Balazs Trencsenyi and Maciej Janowski

East Central Europe is a peer-reviewed journal of social sciences and humanities with a focus on the region between the Baltic and the Adriatic, published in cooperation with the Central European University. The journal seeks to maintain the heuristic value of regional frameworks of interpretation as models of historical explanation, transcending the nation-state at sub-national or trans-national level, and to link them to global academic debates. East Central Europe has an interdisciplinary orientation, combining area studies with history and social sciences, most importantly political science, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies. It aims to stimulate the dialogue and exchange between scholarship produced in and on East-Central Europe and other area study traditions, in a global context. East Central Europe is made in close cooperation with Pasts, Inc. in Central European University ( www.ceu.hu/pasts).

Need support prior to submitting your manuscript? Make the process of preparing and submitting a manuscript easier with Brill's suite of author services, an online platform that connects academics seeking support for their work with specialized experts who can help.

Isn’t Central Europe Dead?

Comments on Iver Neumann’s “Forgetting the Central Europe of the 1980s”

Series:

Maria Todorova

It is a pleasure to agree with most of the preceding analysis of the notion of Central Europe. It is an even greater pleasure and challenge to disagree with some of the basic premises of this intelligent interpretation. One of these differences concerns the fundamental approach to the concept of

The Battle for Central Europe

The Siege of Szigetvár and the Death of Süleyman the Magnificent and Nicholas Zrínyi (1566)

Edited by Pál Fodor

In The Battle for Central Europe specialists in sixteenth-century Ottoman, Habsburg and Hungarian history provide the most comprehensive picture possible of a battle that determined the fate of Central Europe for centuries. Not only the siege and the death of its main protagonists are discussed, but also the wider context of the imperial rivalry and the empire buildings of the competing great powers of that age.

Contributors include Gábor Ágoston, János B. Szabó, Zsuzsa Barbarics-Hermanik, Günhan Börekçi, Feridun M. Emecen, Alfredo Alvar Ezquerra, István Fazekas, Pál Fodor, Klára Hegyi, Colin Imber, Damir Karbić, József Kelenik, Zoltán Korpás, Tijana Krstić, Nenad Moačanin, Gülru Neci̇poğlu, Erol Özvar, Géza Pálffy, Norbert Pap, Peter Rauscher, Claudia Römer, Arno Strohmeyer, Zeynep Tarım, James D. Tracy, Gábor Tüskés, Szabolcs Varga, Nicolas Vatin.

Editorial-board Steven Beller, Marc R. Forster, Atina Grossmann, Peter Hayes, Susan Karant-Nunn, Mary Lindemann, H.C. Erik Midelfort, David Sabean, Jonathan Sperber and Jan de Vries

Studies in Central European Histories is a peer-reviewed book series that presents original work and translations of the histories of the German-speaking and closely related peoples of Central Europe between the Middle Ages and the present. It aims to bring forward new and neglected perspectives on important subjects and issues in the histories of these peoples. The series is designed for advanced students and scholars of German and European history in the early modern and modern periods.

General Editors: David M. Luebke and Celia Applegate.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Jan Patočka and Marek Turčáni

This outstanding work is a manual that enables one to identify pupae, or empty pupal skins, of about two thirds (some 2,600 species) of the Central European Lepidoptera. The text part of about 560 pages comprises a short introduction, identification keys, and species-for species accounts including succinct descriptions of pupal morphology as well as information about habitats, life-style and food plants. The illustration part consists of 271 plates including more than 8,000 line drawings of the treated pupae and/or structural details pertinent for their identification.
Lepidoptera Pupae of Central Europe should be useful for anyone with a primary interest in Central European Lepidoptera. It will also be indispensable for population ecologists studying predators and parasites of Lepidoptera, for soil biologists (since so many Lepidoptera pupate in/on the soil), and for applied entomologists in need of identifying lepidopteran pests without rearing the adults. All families are well covered except for the Nepticulidae and Coleophoridae, for which much basic research on pupal stucture still remains to be done (and whose immatures are usually identifiable from mine architecture/case structure anyway) and a few of the smallest families.

The Carolingians in Central Europe, their History, Arts and Architecture

A Cultural History of Central Europe, 750-900

Series:

Herbert Schutz

This book presents an historical overview of the Frankish realms in Central Europe during the Carolingian period. Against this background Part II of the book examines the cultural inventory deposited by the scribal culture in Central Europe as represented by manuscripts, crystals, ivories and gem encrusted liturgical art. Part III deals with such examples of Carolingian wall painting and architecture as are still evident in Central Europe. Though some examples are derivative, many are original. To reflect the splendor of the objects and surfaces discussed in Parts II and III, the book is lavishly ornamented with pertinent color illustrations. Black and white illustrations generally serve the representation of architecture.