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East Central Europe is a peer-reviewed journal of social sciences and humanities with a focus on the region between the Baltic and the Adriatic, published in cooperation with the Central European University. The journal seeks to maintain the heuristic value of regional frameworks of interpretation as models of historical explanation, transcending the nation-state at sub-national or trans-national level, and to link them to global academic debates. East Central Europe has an interdisciplinary orientation, combining area studies with history and social sciences, most importantly political science, sociology, anthropology, and cultural studies. It aims to stimulate the dialogue and exchange between scholarship produced in and on East-Central Europe and other area study traditions, in a global context. East Central Europe is made in close cooperation with Pasts, Inc. in Central European University ( www.ceu.hu/pasts).

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Editor: Vasil Gluchman
Central European Value Studies is a pluralistic project that makes available to the English-speaking world books in all areas of value inquiry that originate in Central Europe or that deal with its major philosophical traditions.

Central European Value Studies is co-sponsored by:
• the Philosophy Seminar of the University of Mainz;
• the Centre for Cultural Research, Aarhus University; and
• the International Academy of Philosophy of the Principality of Liechtenstein

Series Editors: David Luebke and Celia Applegate
Studies in Central European Histories is a peer-reviewed book series that presents original work and translations of the histories of the German-speaking and closely related peoples of Central Europe between the Middle Ages and the present. It aims to bring forward new and neglected perspectives on important subjects and issues in the histories of these peoples. The series is designed for advanced students and scholars of German and European history in the early modern and modern periods.

General Editors: David M. Luebke and Celia Applegate.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Author: Cornelia Aust

across geographic, political and cultural boundaries. This article demonstrates how closely Jewish merchants were integrated into the financial system of eighteenth-century central and east central Europe; through their usage of bills of exchange. This article traces the usage and the related internal

In: Migrating Words, Migrating Merchants, Migrating Law

‘old’ canonical authors, who, as David Damrosch has noted, have gained added value from postcolonial contextualisations. 2 Since the beginning of the 21st century, postcolonialism has also significantly redefined comparative literature studies in Eastern and Central Europe. It has inspired the

In: Taking Stock – Twenty-Five Years of Comparative Literary Research
Author: Marta Moore

The Common Cultural Context This chapter investigates a body of art that can be defined as a Central European genre and is represented by such authors and directors as Danilo Kis, Milan Kundera, Czeslaw Milosz, Gyorgy Konrad, Istvan Szabo, Agnieszka Holland, Laszlo Nemes, and many others. The

In: On Fear, Horror, and Terror: Giving Utterance to the Unutterable

Overseas Migration and Central European Migration History Vienna and Budapest, the two capitals of Austria-Hungary, were undergoing fundamental transformations in the course of the long nineteenth century: as capital cities, they were centres of industry and commerce as well as places where

In: Journal of Migration History
This first volume in the bi-lingual handbook The Auchenorrhyncha of Central Europe / Die Zikaden Mitteleuropas (to be published in 3 volumes) is an essential and highly valuable addition to the literature available in this field since the last keys published date from 1935 (Haupt) and 1896 (Melichar) respectively.
These insects are a very important group: in grassland ecosystems they are one of the most abundant and diverse groups. They are collected in enormous numbers in every entomo-ecological project and are also important from a phytopathological point of view, since many species are virus vectors and/or damage crops as well as various herbs and ornamental trees and shrubs.
Simple keys allow an easy identification to the 250 species treated from Central Europe, Northern Europe and the UK. More than 250 drawings as well as 250 distribution maps are included. Almost all species are figured in (700) colour photographs. In addition, information on taxonomy, host plants, habitats, phenology, distribution and economic importance are given.
Planthoppers and leafhoppers are among the most abundant and diverse taxa in terrestrial ecosystems. Therefore, this first volume of the handbook will be a very important reference tool, not only for entomologists but for everyone working in the fields of ecology, applied zoology and nature conservation.

The nature of labor movements and their political involvement and impact has recently been a matter of academic as well as political concern, at global level. In this respect, post-communist transformation in Eastern Europe offers an interesting case study. In the second half of 2007, the journal East Central Europe organized a debate on political scientist David Ost’s pioneering book The Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in Postcommunist Europe. A study on socialist and postsocialist political culture, the book focuses on the evolution of Solidarność (Solidarity) in Poland over two decades, 1980–2000. While accounting for the Polish postsocialist path to what might be called “popular illiberalism,” Ost also tackles wider issues concerning processes of democratization in times of crisis. This debate includes five short polemical essays written by three graduate students (Kacper Pobłocki, Tibor T. Meszmann, and Gábor Halmai), one junior scholar (Eszter Bartha) and one senior scholar (Don Kalb). The authors are trained in different disciplines (anthropology, political science, and history) and are specializing in the history of different countries (Poland, Hungary, Serbia, and Slovenia), thus adding to the debate a variety of disciplinary and national perspectives. The reviewers acknowledge the paramount importance of Ost’s book, calling it “a mustread” for all scholars interested in East European politics and labor movements. They commend the author for bringing the concept of class back to postsocialist analyses, and for addressing a set of important interdisciplinary theoretical and methodological questions. At the same time, the reviewers question Ost’s eclectic methodology on various grounds, criticizing it mainly for a lack of “temporal tracking,” for placing too much “causal weight” on “elite discourses” in producing the turn to illiberalism at the expense of anthropological research at grass-roots level, and for assigning too little agency to non-elites and the “worker-citizens.” In his response, David Ost clarifies the theoretical framework and main arguments of his book and further elaborates on his position, both conceptually and empirically. He advances a normative argument for consolidating democracy in Eastern Europe, arguing that “political entrepreneurs must rethink, reimagine, recontextualize the concept of class, and must try to make conflicts over interests more appealing to the populace than conflicts over identities.”

In: East Central Europe